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Parafon (Chlorzoxazone)

###table###Parafon(Chlorzoxazone)
CONTROLLING WEIGHT: PROTEIN AND CARBOHYDRATE
In Britain and the U.S.A. we get 11 to 12 per cent of our food energy from protein. Most of this protein is of good quality, coming from eggs, meat, fish and dairy products. This is a generous intake, more than is essential for health. There may be advantages in obtaining a somewhat greater proportion of our protein from vegetable sources. Vegetable protein is less expensive than animal protein, and world supplies of animal products are limited. Soybean protein has recently become widely available. Unlike animal foods, protein foods from legumes (peas, beans, lentils) and other vegetable sources are seldom accompanied by large amounts of saturated fat. And there has been a recent suggestion by Dr С Sirtori of Milan that soybean protein lowers the blood cholesterol. Further, these vegetable foods provide additional roughage (fibre).
The remainder of food energy comes chiefly from carbohydrate. If fat intake is reduced we need more carbohydrate. This comes from bread, cereals, vegetables and fruit. Many such foods are good sources of fibre, but of the many kinds of bread it is only the whole-meal varieties which provide useful amounts. In England carbohydrate intake has been falling progressively over the last thirty years, being replaced by fat. The prudent diet reverses this trend, returning to what was usual some decades ago.
The goal of the diet is thus to prevent or deal with obesity and to reduce the blood-cholesterol level. The diet should be as similar as possible to that which is already habitual for millions of people in the world, to provide added reassurance that it is in no way harmful.
Some individuals with unusually high blood cholesterol or triglyceride may need special diets; usually these follow the same trend as the prudent diet, but the restrictions are greater.
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