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Viagra (Sildenafil Citrate)

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Other names: Revatio, Kamagra, Kamagra, Caverta, Intagra, Lovegra, Silagra
WOMEN’S HEALTH: WHAT ARE THE CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR HRT?
Contraindications are medical conditions you may have, or be at risk of, which mean you should not take a particular drug or medicine. For HRT these are listed in the British National Formulary as:
• liver disease,
• breast cancer,
• history of thrombosis.
Another list of risk factors is given under the heading ‘Cautions’. If you suffer from any of these you should think twice before taking HRT:
• high blood pressure,
• benign (not cancerous) breast disease e.g. breast cysts,
• fibroids (benign tumours in the womb),
• migraine,
• endometriosis (the lining of the womb growing in other places than just the womb).
HRT has an effect on the whole circulatory system – your blood circulation, your veins and your arteries. So it can increase the risks of raised blood pressure, migraine, strokes and thrombosis. It also increases your levels of oestrogen, the ‘building’ hormone, and hence the risks of breast tissue changes, fibroids and endometriosis. And there is the ‘domino’ effect on other vital organs: the liver, for instance, which is your ‘waste disposal unit’ and helps remove excess hormones from the body. If it has to work overtime to remove hormones added into your body from HRT, its function can be affected, increasing the possibility of liver disease.
It is obvious from looking at the evidence that there are risks involved in taking HRT. There are also some women who cannot take it because of their medical or family history. The scientists don’t all agree over the percentage of the risks, especially with breast cancer, but they do agree there are increased risks. In a situation like this it is necessary for us as women to weigh up the positive and negative benefits of HRT. For some women who have had a surgical menopause early in life, HRT may be necessary. The sudden fall in hormone levels when their ovaries are removed is a tough challenge for the body. But women going through a natural menopause (with or without a womb) are in a very different situation.
*17/101/5*

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