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Archive for the ‘Men’s Health’ Category

Himcolin

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
WHAT IS IT—COLD OR FLU?
Although colds and flu share some of the same symptoms—coughs, sore throats, nasal congestion and muscle aches—they’re caused by entirely different viruses, and flu symptoms are usually more severe. “A cold tends to be more upper respiratory, with nasal congestion, sore throat and earache,” says Susan Debin, M.D., a family doctor in private practice in Orange, California. “When you get into the flu, it tends to be more in the chest.”
Fever is another tip-off. With flu, your temperature may shoot up to 101°F or higher within a few hours, while a cold may not cause much of a fever at all. In a study of 139 adults with colds, for example, fewer than 1 percent had fevers above 99.6°F. (Maybe that’s why they call it a cold.)
Perhaps the main difference between colds and flu is the severity of the illness. Flu tends to be far more uncomfortable—and dangerous, experts say. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, flu in this country is responsible for about 15,000 deaths a year. In addition, some flu strains have been frighteningly “hot.” In 1918, for example, a supervirulent strain of flu killed about 21 million people worldwide.
If you’re otherwise good health, of course, getting a cold or flu is unlikely to have dire consequences. The worst of the illness will pass within a few days, although you may have some residual pain and fatigue for a week or two longer.
*150/257/8*

Declomycin (Demeclocycline)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Declomycin(Demeclocycline)
WHAT’S NEW IN FOOD RESEARCH: STAYING HEALTHY WITH ANTIOXIDANTS
It used to be considered normal for a man’s body to go downhill with age. Today, researchers have traced much of this damage to free radicals, highly reactive molecules that your body produces during normal metabolic processes.
Short on electrons, free radicals scavenge them from your body’s tissues, leaving damaged cells behind. As you age, this damage shows up in the form of clogged arteries, cataracts and other acts of terrorism going on inside your body.
Enter the antioxidants—substances produced by the body or found in your diet that wipe out free radicals before they can do their dirty work. They include the nutrients vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene.
“It’s very important that we take in enough antioxidants to neutralize free radicals,” says Joanne Curran-Celentano, R.D., Ph.D., associate professor of nutrition and food sciences at the University of New Hampshire in Durham. “If we don’t get enough, the result is oxidative damage.”
Here’s more on the big three antioxidant nutrients.
Vitamin C. The star of countless orange juice commercials, vitamin C can help prevent a slew of health problems, from minor infections to heart attacks. And what about vitamin C’s fabled ability to ward off the common cold? Some studies show it can decrease the severity of colds, and some don’t,” says Dr. Curran-Celentano. “But even though the studies aren’t conclusive, so many people swear by it that it’s certainly worth trying.”
The Daily Value for vitamin C—60 milligrams, the “full day’s supply” found in a glass of orange juice—is certainly enough to prevent a deficiency but probably not enough to reap the preventive benefits, says Dr. Curran-Celentano. “Many people take supplements that contain 500 to 1,000 milligrams a day routinely, which is perfectly safe,” she says.
Vitamin C is also abundant in citrus fruits and some vegetables, including peppers, tomatoes, broccoli and cauliflower. (Eat them raw or lightly cooked, though, since vitamin C is destroyed during cooking.)
Vitamin E. This vitamin prevents the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein, the “bad” cholesterol—a process that seems to lead to arterial plaque gunking up your arteries, making you a candidate for a heart attack. Unfortunately, vitamin E is found mostly in vegetable oils, which the heart-conscious man would do well to limit, says Dr. Curran-Celentano. Why? Vegetable oil is a type of fat.
“My feeling—and it’s backed up by many studies—-is that the levels of vitamin E that seem to be protective are very hard to get through diet alone.” She suggests men take a daily supplement of about 100 international units.
Beta-carotene. A form of vitamin A, beta-carotene is another powerful antioxidant with preventive benefits. “Studies show that people with a high intake of beta-carotene—between five and six milligrams a day—have a lower incidence of heart disease and cancer, especially colon cancer,” says Dr. Curran-Celentano. “It’s easy to get that much if you eat the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables a day.” Go for orange fruits, such as cantaloupe, mangoes, peaches and apricots, and vegetables, such as carrots, , squash and sweet potatoes.
*19/257/8*

Neggram (Nalidixic Acid)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Neggram(NalidixicAcid)
ANGINA AND LONG-TERM RESPONSES TO STRESS
We have covered the main physiological, emotional, cognitive and behavioural responses to stress. You will be able to identify one or more responses that you have experienced at some time.
These are all normal responses to stress on a continuum from mild to extreme. Someone who responded minimally to stress at one time may respond in an extreme way at a different time. The short-term mild responses may not be harmful at all but the long-term chronic stress responses can be catastrophic for some people.
We are all genetically programmed to develop certain illnesses under certain conditions favourable for that illness. What we don’t know is what illnesses, under which conditions, and for whom. Stress may act as a trigger for one or other of those illnesses, causing the body to identify its weak system and respond accordingly by showing signs of an illness. But because the symptoms of these illnesses may cause stress responses in themselves it is very difficult to know which came first, the stress or the illness.
There is sound research evidence to suggest that the way we behave (and therefore think and feel) can trigger coronary disease including hypertension, chronic pain, digestive ulcers and bowel disorders. There is some, albeit weak, evidence to suggest that stress may also be related to asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes. This does not always imply that stress causes these diseases but we know that for some people stressful events can trigger an exacerbation or ‘flare-up’ of the illness. This is especially true in angina. Chronic stress can manifest itself as chronic back pain, headaches, unexplained fatigue in one’s limbs, undue disability from a physical illness, sexual problems and many other disorders.
Being labelled’ ill’ or ‘disabled’ can have detrimental effects on the way some people behave. Being told you have a chronic illness can have an effect on the way you think and feel about yourself also. For example, if someone has a mental picture of a person with a long-term illness as a passive, pathetic figure who cannot perform essential tasks, then this will cause them to lose respect for themselves and to see themselves as dependent and even a burden on others. This can lead to severely strained relationships within the family. They may also believe that having a chronic illness (such as angina) means they have to stop doing any physical work and retire to the armchair. By behaving in this excessively passive way (known as sick role behaviour) they let their fitness lapse, bringing on more angina and other aches and pains as the joints and muscles deteriorate from underuse. This may begin the downward spiral of sadness, debilitation and depression.
There is good research evidence to suggest that people may be more disabled by their thoughts and feelings about their illness and what it means to them than the actual extent of the illness warrants.
People who behave, think and feel in this way have very poor expectations from life. They often feel they are not worthy of help and successfully merge into becoming the disabled person they had the image of in their mind. Sometimes they become irritable through frustration and may be aggressive to others. Because they behave in this way they may isolate themselves from their family and friends and eventually find themselves receiving little support from others and become more dependent on strangers for assistance.
This behaviour can have an effect on the way others see the person too. The medical and social services often treat disabled people as passive, pathetic recipients who will accept any standards of care. This is not too surprising if this is how the person behaves and thinks of him/herself. So, once again a vicious circle is set up with people being more disabled than their physical condition necessitates because their thoughts, behaviour and feelings play a role in their ‘disability’.
Tom used to be the life and soul of the party. He was a keen fisherman and everyone who knew him enjoyed his company. When he was told he had angina Tom remembered how a good friend of his had died from a heart attack and he connected the two. He began to ‘take it easy’. He retired from work, gave up fishing, and things went from bad to worse. He became irritable and frustrated because he could not do what he used to do and because he missed the social contact with friends.
Arguments with his wife increased because, as she said, ‘He’s around the house, getting in the way, all day long’. He began to see himself as a burden and lost respect for himself. He became snappy to the grandchildren and eventually they stopped visiting.
After a year Tom had an angiogram which showed he had very mild coronary disease and he enrolled in the physical training classes. Slowly but surely he regained some physical fitness and the angina became less troublesome. He began to renew his friendships and took up fishing again.
Tom still cannot do all the things he would like to do but now he accepts it. He still believes he is a person to be respected and his friends and family enjoy the new, more relaxed Tom as much as the one before he had angina.
Now that we have covered most of the stress responses, fill in your answers to the stress questionnaire which follows and try to build up a picture of your predominant responses to stress. Knowing yourself is half the battle of changing. The next chapter will look in more detail at ways of controlling your stress responses.
*37/108/2*

Propecia (Finasteride)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Propecia(Finasteride)
Other names: Proscar
NATURAL ALTERNATIVES TO HRT: SEVEN-DAY LIVER ‘SPRING CLEAN’
Because the liver, as our ‘waste disposal unit’, will eliminate toxins and waste products properly when it is working efficiently, we need to keep it functioning in peak condition, especially at the menopause when it is clearing out our ‘old’ hormones. This is a very gentle detox regime. Days 1 to 2: cut out tea, coffee and alcohol to prepare your body for the cleanse. Days 3 to 7: first thing in the morning, before you have eaten anything, drink this liver ‘flush’ to help your body get rid of toxins and give you a ‘spring clean’. In a liquidizer mix:
200ml (8fl oz) freshly squeezed lemon juice
200ml (8fl oz) spring or mineral water
1 clove of fresh garlic
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cm (1/2 inch) fresh ginger root.
If you can’t drink all that lemon juice, use organic apple juice instead with a squeeze of lemon. Blend to a smooth liquid and drink slowly.
Drink some apple juice afterwards if you have an aftertaste, and fifteen minutes later drink a cup of hot peppermint tea. Then eat normally but keep your meals very simple so that your body has the chance to eliminate toxins. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables salads, stir-fried vegetables, vegetable soups, brown rice, porridge oats, etc. You may have headaches or flu-like symptoms for the first couple of days, which are indications that you are detoxifying. You must eat well to keep your blood sugar up. You can repeat this programme every couple of months if you feel you benefit from it.
Herbs
It should be clear from what has gone before that herbal remedies can be very effective in treating the liver, with dandelion and milk thistle at the top of the list. Both these herbs have the ability to help the cleansing process, while milk thistle is also capable of stimulating production of new liver cells.
Feverfew has received a lot of media attention as an ‘anti-migraine’ herb. It really should be used daily as a preventative rather than taken at the time of an attack. A study at the London Migraine Clinic and reported in the British Medical Journal showed remarkable results using this herb.
*56/101/5*

Eulexin (Flutamide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Eulexin(Flutamide)
HEADACHES FROM HELL: LIFE-THREATENING HEADACHES
Among the range of life-threatening conditions in which headache may be a symptom are:
stroke (a blockage in the blood supply to the brain) — usually due to either an arterial clot or fatty deposit of arterial plaque;
subarachnoid haemorrhage — caused by a rupture in the brain arterial system which forces blood into the cavity between the brain and the skull;
brain tumour—brain tumours only rarely present as a dull or throbbing headache, but may sometimes do so;
hypertension — blood pressure can sometimes be so high that it causes headache, often accompanied by blurred vision;
temporal arteritis — in which the arteries which run up the side of the skull become inflamed, causing severe head pain to one side of the head. This pain will usually be around the temple which becomes sensitive to touch; and
head injuries — in which headache symptoms may develop immediately or within 48 hours.
Although this final category of life-threatening disease makes up only a very small sector of the whole class of headache types, it is important to realise that any headache can be potentially dangerous by virtue of being neglected.
If a headache is indicative of a serious underlying disease such as a brain tumour or blood clot, the head pain will generally remain relatively constant and confined to one small area of the head. Most non-life-threatening headaches experienced do not pinpoint any particular area of the head.
If a pattern of recurring, non-local headaches does occur, however, it is always best to consult a doctor for further diagnosis. Additionally, if a headache occurs in any of the following circumstances, it is wise to have this headache history immediately analysed by a medical professional:
a headache commences without warning;
a headache occurs after a recent sore throat or head injury;
a headache is accompanied by fever, a stiff neck, rash, seizures, double vision, mental confusion, numbness or weakness; or
if you experience chronic, progressive headaches which worsen after coughing, exertion or straining.
*7/107/2*

Himplasia

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
SYMPTOMS IT IS WISE NOT TO IGNORE: COUGHING AND HOARSENESS
For a non-smoker, a cough which mysteriously rears it head and lingers for weeks is a reason to see a doctor immediately. If a cough begins which is unassociated with a cold, and has not disappeared within two weeks, it could signal a number of different illnesses.
A hacking cough could signal the possibility of a serious lung infection, such as pneumonia or even cancer. Persistent coughing may also be due to gastroesophageal reflux disease, a condition in which some of the stomach’s contents migrate back up the oesophagus.
Persistent hoarseness is a related condition which should also be taken more seriously than it is by most men who believe that a husky voice is sexy. Excessive, lingering hoarseness could be a sign of throat cancer or it could be the result of postnasal drainage or chronic irritation of the vocal chords.
If either hoarseness or coughing persist without any obvious explanation, consult your doctor to be sure a more serious illness is not the cause.
*15/107/2*

Casodex (Bicalutamide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Casodex(Bicalutamide)
HEADACHES FROM HELL: INFECTION HEADACHES
One of the most dangerous classes of head pain arises from infection. Almost any infection may give rise to head pain, but sinusitis is one of the most common causes.
When the sinuses become blocked or infected, the pressure
inside them increases, causing pain towards the front of the head,
forehead and eyes. A simple but not foolproof test of whether your
head pain is due to sinusitis can be performed by lowering your
head between your knees to see if the pain increases.
Sinusitis may be caused, by exposure to contaminants in the air, as in the case of car or industrial fumes, or in the out-gassing of plastics, glues, synthetic carpet fibres and so on, observed in ‘sick building syndrome’. There are simple steps you can take to alleviate this problem.
Try not to have your desk near the photocopier at work, avoid jogging or cycling in heavily trafficked streets and make sure you get regular bouts of fresh air (as opposed to the air-conditioned variety). The key here is fresh air, as pollution can exacerbate or contribute to sinus problems.
Allergy may be another cause of infection leading to headache, as can bacterial infections accompanying colds or the flu virus. If you believe that your headaches may be caused by an allergy, there is much you can do to prevent the problem. Many people find that the elimination of dairy products from their diet may be helpful, as they tend to be mucus-producing, thereby contributing to blocked sinuses.
When allergies persist and give rise to accompanying headaches, seek the advice of an enlightened doctor and find out whether complementary therapies such as acupuncture or aromatherapy can help.
One form of infection associated with severe headache is meningitis, an inflammation of the tissues which surround the brain. Although meningitis occurs rarely, if not diagnosed quickly, it can rapidly lead to death, especially in children. In addition to the presence of a severe headache, one of the discriminating factors of meningitis is a stiff neck, accompanied by nausea or vomiting. If you suspect meningitis, call your doctor at once. If the sufferer finds it. impossible or extremely difficult to touch the chin to the chest, you have good reason to be suspicious, so do not delay in getting help.
*6/107/2*

Viagra (Sildenafil Citrate)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
Other names: Revatio, Kamagra, Kamagra, Caverta, Intagra, Lovegra, Silagra
WOMEN’S HEALTH: WHAT ARE THE CONTRAINDICATIONS FOR HRT?
Contraindications are medical conditions you may have, or be at risk of, which mean you should not take a particular drug or medicine. For HRT these are listed in the British National Formulary as:
• liver disease,
• breast cancer,
• history of thrombosis.
Another list of risk factors is given under the heading ‘Cautions’. If you suffer from any of these you should think twice before taking HRT:
• high blood pressure,
• benign (not cancerous) breast disease e.g. breast cysts,
• fibroids (benign tumours in the womb),
• migraine,
• endometriosis (the lining of the womb growing in other places than just the womb).
HRT has an effect on the whole circulatory system – your blood circulation, your veins and your arteries. So it can increase the risks of raised blood pressure, migraine, strokes and thrombosis. It also increases your levels of oestrogen, the ‘building’ hormone, and hence the risks of breast tissue changes, fibroids and endometriosis. And there is the ‘domino’ effect on other vital organs: the liver, for instance, which is your ‘waste disposal unit’ and helps remove excess hormones from the body. If it has to work overtime to remove hormones added into your body from HRT, its function can be affected, increasing the possibility of liver disease.
It is obvious from looking at the evidence that there are risks involved in taking HRT. There are also some women who cannot take it because of their medical or family history. The scientists don’t all agree over the percentage of the risks, especially with breast cancer, but they do agree there are increased risks. In a situation like this it is necessary for us as women to weigh up the positive and negative benefits of HRT. For some women who have had a surgical menopause early in life, HRT may be necessary. The sudden fall in hormone levels when their ovaries are removed is a tough challenge for the body. But women going through a natural menopause (with or without a womb) are in a very different situation.
*17/101/5*

Flomax (Tamsulosin)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Flomax(Tamsulosin)
CHRONIC FATIGUE: TAMING CHRONIC FATIGUE
Because the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome are similar to some of the early symptoms of so many other conditions—everything from kidney disease and anemia to AIDS and leukemia—the first step for anyone who thinks he may have it is to rule out those other possibilities. That means getting an evaluation by a doctor who is familiar with the CFS guidelines set out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
And if you are one of the men diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, here are some steps you can take to make your battle with it as short and as easy as possible.
Slow down. Stress is one of the common denominators for guys with chronic fatigue syndrome—so many overextended young professionals came down with CFS in the go-go 1980s that it became known as the yuppie flu. Thus, the universally recommended treatment for CFS is simple: Get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet and exercise moderately.
“Look at your lifestyle,” says Peter Manu, M.D., director of medical services at Hillside Hospital in New Hyde Park, New York. “Rearrange your priorities, cut down on the pressure. You have to start drawing the line somewhere.”
Stay active. Becoming sedentary or being groggy from too much sleep are both common side effects of CFS. “We find most CFS patients sleep too much,” says Dr. Manu.
With CFS you won’t feel like working out, and vigorous exercise only makes the fatigue worse. Nevertheless, do try to get aerobic exercise, even if that means no more than getting up and walking around the house—even minor activity will be better for your body in the long run. “If you don’t have muscle fatigue already, you’re going to get it by spending three months in bed,” warns Dr. Manu.
*143/257/8*

Confido

Friday, November 6th, 2009

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SYMPTOMS IT IS WISE NOT TO IGNORE: UNEXPLAINED LUMPS
Any lumps on the body which seem to have arisen mysteriously, or lumps which appear to have grown rapidly, are lumps which require expert advice to ensure correct diagnosis. Men are especially prone to ignore a new-found lump for fear that it could be cancerous and they would rather not know about it. A lump can, in fact, be anything from a harmless cyst or abscess, to a migrating internal organ, obstructed urethra or even surface vein.
The location of a lump is important for its diagnosis and no lump should be ignored. For example, a lump found in the neck area could signify something as serious as Hodgkin’s disease, a malignant disorder of the lymphoid tissue. Lumps which suddenly appear or grow larger do not automatically signal cancer, but they should always be carefully monitored. If you detect such changes, do not hesitate to see a specialist promptly. If caught early enough, even cancerous lumps may often be removed successfully with little damage to surrounding tissue. So be alert and do not delay in seeking professional help.
*14/107/2*

Avodart (Dutasteride)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Avodart(Dutasteride)
Other names: Dutagen
COLDS AND FLU: FINDING COMFORT
Even if you take an active role in trying to head off colds and flu, at least three to four times every year or so your nose is likely to be transformed into a nasal Niagara. Although there isn’t a cure for these viral interlopers, there are ways to make yourself more comfortable.
Bring out the big guns. When your flu is caused by the type-A virus, your doctor may recommend a prescription drug called amantadine (Symadine, Symmetrel). Taken within two days of the onset of symptoms, amantadine can cut the duration of your illness in half, says Michael Fleming, M.D., a family physician in private practice in Shreveport, Louisiana. But fast action is critical: If you wait a week before taking the drug, it probably won’t be effective.
Drink up. This is the best way to keep virus-fighting mucus thin and flowing. When you’re sick, “the mucus secretions can get very thick,” says Dr. Debin. “And when they’re thick they’re going to obstruct airways—that’s when pneumonia can set in.” Drinking eight to ten eight-ounce glasses of water a day should help keep things fluid. Warm liquids are usually more soothing than cold ones, she adds.
Go easy on the booze. Alcohol can suppress your immune system and make you even more uncomfortable by drying out mucous membranes. So lay off the libations until after you’re feeling better, says Dr. Fleming.
Eat well. Good nutrition—lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, along with protein sources, like beans, dairy products and lean meats—makes for a stronger immune system, research shows. While a well-rounded diet won’t prevent all colds and flus, it will improve your odds for staying healthy, adds Dr. Fleming.
Exercise a cold. Regular exercise can help prevent colds by strengthening your immune system. But research also suggests that exercise during a cold also might help you get over it. But there are several “buts”. Wait until the acute symptoms have passed—usually three days—and go easy. Do not exercise if you are experiencing chest congestion, aching muscles, a hacking cough or a fever. You could slow your recuperation if you do, says Bryant Stamford, Ph.D., director of the Health Promotion and Wellness Center at the University of Lousville.
*153/257/8*

Speman

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

###table###
COLDS AND FLU: COLD WAR DEFENSES
Given the huge number of cold viruses out there, preparing an effective vaccine is virtually impossible. But because flu has only three main strains—types A, B and C—it makes an easier target.
The principle behind a vaccine is simple. When you take a serum that contains inactivated viruses, your immune system is stimulated to make antibodies to kill that same type of virus in the future—without making you sick in the process. Studies have shown that an annual flu shot will prevent about 70 percent of flu cases.
Doctors typically recommend flu shots for people over age 65 or those with long-term, serious conditions, like asthma or diabetes. But even young people who are high risk, such as smokers or those who work in high-exposure areas like schools or hospitals, should consider getting vaccinated, says Dr. Debin.
After you get the shot, it will take your immune system about two weeks to marshal its defenses. So don’t wait until the flu’s already swept through the office before seeing your doctor. It’s best, experts say, to get vaccinated between October 15 and November 15—before the flu season peaks.
*151/257/8*

Tentex Royal

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

###table###
SYMPTOMS IT IS WISE NOT TO IGNORE: BRUISES AND EXCESSIVE SWEATING
Bruising easily may also be a cause for concern. If a small knock gives you a huge swelling, your blood may be less healthy than it should be, perhaps suffering from a low platelet count. Since it is the central role of platelets to assist the blood in clotting, the condition, if left unattended, could be dangerous.
Constant, severe bruising could be a potent physical signal of a simple vitamin deficiency, but it may also be a potential symptom of HIV infection. If you find yourself bruising on a regular basis and the severity of the bruises seems to be inexplicable, ease your concerns with a visit to the doctor.
People generally experience differing degrees of perspiration from the same amount of physical exertion. This is natural and depends on a variety of factors, including water intake, your fitness level and heart rate, and your own particular tendency to sweat. A small amount of perspiration is normal, especially in hot climates, even if you are not engaged in exercise.
If what is experienced during exercise or at rest could be described as a drenching sweat, however, and if you frequently wake up with the sheets soaked after a relatively restful night’s sleep, an infection may be the cause. Persistent bouts of drenching sweat may be a sign of tuberculosis or an early symptom of HIV or other infectious disease, so do not delay in having your symptoms checked by an expert.
*17/107/2*

Uroxatral (Alfuzosin)

Thursday, July 2nd, 2009

###table###Uroxatral(Alfuzosin)
CLUES TO A HEADACHE-FREE LIFESTYLE
If you find it difficult to classify your headache in a way that helps to prevent them, try keeping a headache diary so that you can determine whether there is an underlying pattern to these headaches. The circumstances in which headaches arise may reveal that they are indeed diet-related.
You may be taking in too much alcohol, too much fat, too much sugar, or getting too little vitamin C or B12. No matter how good recreational drugs may make you feel in the short term, severe headaches may be just one of their side effects in the long term.
Consider your work situation:
Do certain personal relationships give you a headache?
Do you get headaches when you work at certain types of machines or equipment?
Do you get headaches in some but not other air-conditioned environments?
Do certain kinds of lighting give you headaches?
Do you work in environments of varying high or low fields of electromagnetic radiation?
Antidepressants have been known to cause headaches, along with processed meats, pickled products and, for some people, wheat. Weather can give rise to headaches in some people (e.g. still, close days), whereas others suffer headaches of dehydration. Some headaches are caused by painkillers, which means that by taking more of them, your headaches only get worse. While sex can sometimes cure a headache, vigorous sex, not unlike vigorous exercise, may also bring on a headache.
The point is that you can only alleviate the problem of headache by increasing your understanding of what gives rise to it. The pattern of headache onset may be easy or difficult to discern, but it is discernible. The cause of your daily headache could be as simple as an uncomfortable chair, or a desk that is too high or low, or even a cricked neck from holding your phone improperly. Become aware of the degree of muscle tension in your neck and do something about it when you recognise it.
Whatever you do, do not just complain and hope someone else will solve your headache problems. The next time you have a headache from hell, find out how it got there and then tell it exactly where it can go.
*8/107/2*

Levitra (Vardenafil)

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

###table###Levitra(Vardenafil)
Other names: Vitra, Vardenafil, Auvitra, Solvetra
SPORTS INJURIES AND MEN’S HEALTH: TYPES OF SPORTS INJURIES
The factors responsible for sports injuries determine in part the types of injuries that occur. In addition to the dangers of the sport itself, the level of fitness of competitors, his or her flexibility and agility, the hardness of the playing and training surfaces (whether on any particular occasion a playing field is wet or a track or ring slippery) all make a difference to the types of injuries athletes suffer. The quality of protective gear and whether it is worn properly can influence both the type of injury incurred and its severity. It is well worth noting that competent coaching and refereeing may also contribute significantly to the number of sporting injuries sustained by competitors.
Appreciation of these factors makes it easy to understand why sporting injuries are traditionally classified into three categories:
Direct injuries;
Indirect injuries; and
Overuse injuries.
DIRECT INJURY
Direct injury refers to those injuries which result from external forces, such as contact with an opponent or some piece of equipment peculiar to the game (e.g. a cricket ball or bat, etc.). Fractures or bone breaks represent the most dramatic kind of direct injury, varying in severity and in kind from simple to compound and those in which the skin is broken to those in which it remains intact.
The familiar example of a common direct injury is the ‘corked thigh’, often referred to medically as intramuscular haematoma, a condition of bruising which results when a competitor is directly struck in the thigh by, say, the knee of an opponent. In such cases, the severity of the injury will be determined by the force or energy of the blow and the inherent or acquired capacity of the relevant part of the athlete’s body in withstanding its force.
The extent to which an athlete is aware of the impending blow may serve also to reduce the risk of injury by affording the athlete an opportunity to maximise the appropriate protective response of that part of the body receiving the blow.
This point is of special relevance in those cases in which an athlete collides with a stationary object such as a goalpost, railing or wall. Even momentary recognition that a collision with a stationary object is about to occur affords athletes the opportunity to prepare themselves in any way they are able to accommodate the impending blow.
INDIRECT INJURY
The second common type of sporting injury is traditionally classified under the category of indirect injury or an injury resulting from internal rather than external forces acting on joints, tendons, ligaments and muscles.
Indirect injuries are essentially soft-tissue injuries and are incurred when muscles, ligaments and tendons are overstretched, or joints sprained or dislocated. Soft-tissue injuries are the most common type of injury experienced by athletes and include tendon ruptures, torn cartilages or ligament tears, as in the case of a sprained ankle.
In the case of soft-tissue injuries, the blood vessels in the areas of damage tend to leak, thus causing swelling and bruising. Reducing the extent of the haemorrhage becomes a matter of vital importance, as the length of time the injury takes to heal will be determined partly by how much blood accumulates in the area.
OVERUSE INJURY
The third category of sports injuries are classed as overuse injuries. This type of injury results from the repetitive use of certain muscles, bones and tendons, an example of which is marathon running.
It is worth noting that those athletes who run 25 kilometres each week place a phenomenal repetitive stress on the knees, ankles and feet. Because the stress to these areas is so great, even a relatively minor injury may become grossly magnified by faulty running techniques, just as an otherwise minor aberration in the structure of the foot or ankle may be magnified under the microscope of constant repetition and transformed into the source of a major overuse injury. It has been estimated that, over the course of a year, athletes who run 25 kilometres every week will have subjected each foot to approximately 250 000 foot strikes against some surface or other, many of which are not well suited to the anatomy of the foot anyway.
Examples of overuse injury include inflammation of the Achilles tendon, swimmer’s shoulder, tennis elbow, knee problems and stress fractures to the feet or legs.
Any tendons associated with constant repetition are also especially vulnerable to injury in that their blood supply deteriorates with age and is, in any event, generally poor. Overuse injuries are particularly common when athletes have had a break in training and return to a highly repetitive activity which at the time involves a sudden and unaccustomed repetitive use of bones or connective tissue such as ligaments and tendons.
According to the ACHPER publication referred to above, Australian Rules football displays the highest number of injuries to the knee, but the highest proportion of total knee injuries is to be found in netball, where the highly repetitive stop-and-start moves, played out on a hard surface, wreak havoc with the knees.
*34/107/2*

Cialis (Tadalafil)

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

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CHRONIC FATIGUE: MAKE YOUR BATTLE AS EASY AS POSSIBLE
Don’t label yourself. Hopkins urges that you keep yourself open to admitting that you may have something besides CFS. Many patients who thought they had CFS have recovered after being treated for everything from sleep disorders and sinus problems to hyperventilation. Depression is often mistaken for chronic fatigue syndrome, too. Dr. Manu, among others, reports that a high percentage of CFS patients respond favorably to antidepressants.
Beware the quacks. Any disease, especially one as mysterious as CFS, is bound to bring out the hustlers. “The way people treat CFS ranges from practices that make a lot of sense to practices that are a bit scary,” says Dr. Fukuda.
There’s a long list of megavitamins, minerals and natural supplements—everything from magnesium and zinc to garlic and black currant oil—that are rumored to relieve the symptoms of CFS. None of these have been proven to be of any value, according to a study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health. The same goes for any number of specialized diets. The Harvard study analyzed the diets that five self-help books claimed would cure CFS, including several that eliminated yeast, sugar and carbohydrates. Again, no proof was found that any of these diets are effective. Worse, the study warned, such diets may actually be harmful because they’re nutritionally unbalanced.
Adopt a diet. Studies aside, many CFS patients have found special diets or vitamin regimens that seem to work for them. In fact, Pat Hopkins says, diets that eliminate sugars and caffeine are especially popular because people with fatigue have a tendency to overindulge in those substances, only to come crashing down again when the rush wears off.
Dr. Manu feels that, if nothing else, such diets can have therapeutic value. “There is no scientific evidence that these things work,” he says, “but there is a lot of anecdotal evidence. If there’s nothing harmful in the diet, I say go ahead. Patients need to feel they have some sense of control, that there’s something they can do.”
*144/257/8*

Viagra (Sildenafil)

Wednesday, June 10th, 2009

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Viagra

TESTICULAR PROBLEMS: EASING THE PAIN OF YOUR PRIVATES
You can’t do much when it comes to treating testicular pain yourself, so leave treatment to the experts. Nevertheless, here are some tips on preventing and alleviating the agony.
Give it a lift. Elevate a swollen scrotum by lying down with a pillow under your butt. If you have an infection, like epididymitis, this will ease the pain. Also try wearing a jockstrap or briefs-style underwear for added support—it gives the same effect. Be warned that if torsion is marauding your manhood, the pain will probably worsen when you give yourself a lift.
Ice is nice. Try an ice compress on swollen testicles to alleviate pain and reduce swelling. But be warned that ice also might increase the pain of torsion.
“If you put an ice compress on your testicles and suddenly the pain gets worse, it’s a pretty gross indicator that you have torsion,” Dr. Neal says. “Of course, you don’t want to rule out torsion if the pain doesn’t worsen with ice.”
Try sticking ice cubes in a plastic bag and wrapping the bag in a hand towel, since applying ice directly to delicate scrotal skin can be damaging.
Try the hot stuff. If ice isn’t doing the trick, then try heat to ease the pain and swelling. Place a heating pad wrapped in a towel or a warm compress on your painful privates.
“Heat sometimes helps, like ice, but remember neither is going to cure the problem. You might feel a little better, but you still heed help,” Dr. Cohen warns.
Fight the inflammation. Stop swelling and pain by taking an adult dosage of any over-the-counter anti-inflammatory, like aspirin or ibuprofen.
Bag it. Since sexually transmitted diseases are common causes of testicular pain, use common sense and wear a condom during sex, especially if you’re having sex with multiple partners or are unsure of your partner’s sexual history. Putting your manhood under wraps might be the easiest thing you can do to prevent testicular pain—and an unwanted sexual souvenir.
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