Language
Pills Search
Language
Categories
  • +Anti-Allergic/Asthma (33)
  • +Anti-Depressant (39)
  • +Anti-Herpes (2)
  • +Anti-Infectives (31)
  • +Anti-Smoking (2)
  • +Antibiotics (43)
  • +Cancer (11)
  • +Cardio & Blood (95)
  • +Diabetes (23)
  • +Epilepsy (7)
  • +Gastrointestinal (22)
  • +General Health (50)
  • +Hair Loss (1)
  • +Healthy Bones (20)
  • +Herbals (5)
  • HIV (7)
  • +Hormonal (1)
  • +Men’s Health (17)
  • +Mental Disorders (9)
  • +Pain Relief/Muscle Relaxant (45)
  • +Parkinson And Alzheimer (7)
  • +Sexual Health (2)
  • +Skin Care (16)
  • +Weight Loss (6)
  • +Women’s Health (37)

Archive for the ‘HIV’ Category

Combivir (Lamivudine, Zidovudine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Combivir(Lamivudine,Zidovudine)
COLD AND FLU: KEEP THE BUGS FROM GETTING YOU
This morning you felt like the race horse of the professional world, ripsnortin’ through your duties a mile ahead of the pack. But by midafternoon you feel more like an aching, dragging, dripping nag. Clearly, you’re not going to win by a nose today—not one that’s this runny.
While colds and flu are unlikely to land you in intensive care, they can keep you in the stable for a few days. What’s more, they’re extremely difficult to avoid. Colds can be caused by more than 200 rhinoviruses—the word literally means nose viruses—and are among the most common illnesses people get. In addition, about one in four Americans gets the flu every year. Among the elderly and infirm the infection rate is even higher, approaching one in two.
How common: Colds and flu are among the most common causes of illnesses worldwide. Each year in the United States they cause 26 million days of missed school and 23 million days of missed work.
Risk factors: Seasons (fall, winter and early spring), stress, allergies, smoking, poor nutrition, being close to an infected person.
Age group affected: Kids younger than age five average 6 to 12 respiratory illnesses a year. In adults, who gradually accumulate protective antibodies, the average is 3 to 4.
Gender gap: Women get more colds than men, possibly because they’re likely to spend more time with children or in healthcare settings.
Who to see: For a difficult cold or flu, talk to a pharmacist or your family doctor. If you have hoarseness, pain in the chest, breathing difficulty or extended vomiting, be sure to get to your family doctor.
*149/257/8*

Retrovir (Zidovudine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Retrovir(Zidovudine)
THE OPHTHALMIC CONTROVERSY OVER RADIAL KERATOTOMY
Several years ago in Marietta, Georgia, 32-year-old nearsighted Alfred Gresham, an engineer, underwent RK for his right eye. Gresham was ready to have his left eye operated on for curing his nearsightedness, but the man found himself caught in the middle of a small but polite war between his eye surgeon and the Georgia Ophthalmological Society. This professional body, warning of the danger of possible delayed side-effects from the RK operation which is spreading rapidly in the United States and overseas, persuaded Georgia state hospitals to temporarily ban the procedure in their operating rooms. Studies which by now have convinced most ophthalmologists that RK is a valid, safe, effective operation for permanent correction of nearsightedness had not yet been carried out.
Gresham told us then that he was “mad as hell” about the “medical politics” which might have prevented the operation on his right eye until the Georgia Ophthalmological Society conducted what could be a multi-year investigation “to determine the procedure’s effectiveness and safety.” This is still sometimes found to be the attitude expressed by some traditionalists in ophthalmology who don’t have training in performing radial keratotomy or the other breakthrough methods of high-tech vision improvement.
Until the fall of 1984, with presentation of the Prospective Evaluation of Radial Keratotomy, PERK study, the American Association of Ophthalmology (AAO) considered the RK procedure investigational rather than experimental. Surgeons who supported the procedure -numbering among them some of the nation’s most distinguished professors and eye surgeons, including one former president of the AAO – agreed that the answers won’t be all put together about side effects until patients have reached the post-surgery mark twenty years from now. But, based on experience with more-complex corneal surgery and with accidental corneal injury, they foresee no serious problems ahead.
Nevertheless, controversy in ophthalmology about refractive surgery continues. It is rife and disagreements are heated among eye physicians when it comes to RK. For example, Long Island, New York ophthalmologist Norman O. Stahl, M.D., was banned from doing RK at his hospital. He could not practice the procedure there and warnings came down from the administration office that he might be thrown out if he continued to try. Dr. Stahl responded by setting up a surgical suite in his private office. No one could stop him from performing the dozens of myopia-correction procedures there.
Since Dr. Stahl took this step, in fact, in-office surgery – called “office-based surgery” – not only for eyes but for a host of other body problems has become rather common. An entirely new medical industry to cut the cost of medical care by eliminating hospital expenses has arisen with the new office-based surgery.
At least four professional groups have been pooling data about RK in order to make some judgments about its safety and effectiveness. They include the National Institute of Health-funded multi-university study headed by George Waring, M.D. of Atlanta, Georgia; the National Refractive Keratotomy study group under the direction of Leo Bores, M.D., of Santa Fe, New Mexico; the Kerato-Refractive Society, under secretary Ronald Schachar, M.D., of Dennison, Texas; and the International Corneal Plastic Micro-Surgery Society, coordinated by Herbert L. Gould, M.D. of White Plains, New York. Additionally, the National Advisory Eye Council has put out a call to all patients who have undergone RK and to all optometrists who have refracted the eyes of such patients to report their observations.
The National Advisory Eye Council is the principal advisory group to the National Eye Institute. In order to discharge its responsibilities to the American public and to the scientific and health care community, the Council has acquired as much information as possible about the safety of RK on humans. The Council has urged people to share whatever information they may possess abut eye problems that have resulted from this surgical procedure.
In addition to complications of the cooperative effort itself, the Council members were looking for any secondary problems, such, as ocular rupture or perforation. Ronald G. Geller, Ph.D., Executive Secretary of the National Eye Institute, advises interested physicians and patients about his survey results. They indicate that no such problems or side effects exist for recipients of radial keratotomy.
Some opponents of RK have attempted to suppress the availability of the operation. They tried to institute a moratorium on the procedure to be done. They also encouraged health insurance companies not to reimburse patients who ordinarily would be covered for financial outlays.
*30/127/5*

Epivir (Lamivudine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Epivir(Lamivudine)
NUTRITION BASICS FOR MEN: PREVENTING THE DRAIN – CUT DOWN ON FAT
Getting too much fat in the diet has been linked to a wide variety of male diseases: heart disease, stroke, cancer and diabetes, to name a few. But many men are confused about dietary fat because it comes in three different forms: saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated. While it’s true that some of these fats do some good, experts agree that you get more benefit from limiting fats of all kinds.
Your diet should consist of no more (and preferably less) than 30 percent fat. (Most American men eat about 37 percent of their total calories as fat.) Not only will this help improve your overall health profile, you might also notice something visible start to happen: You’ll begin losing weight. That’s because the body burns carbohydrates—the type of calories you get from grains, pasta, fruits and vegetables—more quickly than it does fats. Cut down on the fat you put in your belly and you’ll cut down on the fat you put on it.
*14/257/8*

Sustiva (Efavirenz)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Sustiva(Efavirenz)
NUTRITION BASICS FOR MEN: PREVENTING THE DRAIN – CUT YOUR CHOLESTEROL AND GRAZE ON HEALTHY FOODS
Cut your cholesterol. In the past, men compared cholesterol readings like box scores, in which low numbers were the clear winners. It’s more complicated than that. More important than your total cholesterol number is the ratio of total cholesterol to the “good” kind, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which can help keep blood vessels clear. Ask your doctor if your ratio is 3.5 to 1 or less. If it is, you’re in good shape. If it’s higher, you’ll want to get to work.
Getting regular exercise and eating a low-fat, low-cholesterol, high-fiber diet should be part of your prescription. Studies also show that getting hooked on fish, specifically cold-water fish—to the tune of one serving a day—may raise HDL significantly.
Graze on healthy foods. No one believes anymore that the traditional three squares a day are necessary or even optimal for good nutrition. By all means, munch between meals. But don’t add snacks—rather, divide what you’d normally eat throughout the day. And be sure that you munch on healthy things: a piece of fruit, for example, or a serving of cottage cheese or pretzels.
*15/257/8*

Videx (Didanosine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
NUTRITION BASICS FOR MEN: PREVENTING THE DRAIN – START THE DAY RIGHT, EAT EVERYTHING—IN MODERATION
Start the day right. In this hectic age of late nights and hour-long commutes, keeping regular mealtimes—or even having meals—can be a challenge. But if you’re only going to eat one real meal a day, make sure it’s breakfast. After eight or more hours in bed your body is running on empty and needs a fill-up. “Of all the time-honored adages regarding food, perhaps the wisest is: ‘Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince and dinner like a pauper,’” says Joanne Curran-Celentano, R.D., PhD., associate professor of nutrition and food sciences at the University of New Hampshire in Durham.
Can’t stand the thought of scrambled eggs first thing in the morning? Then heat some of last night’s stew or boil up a plate of pasta. It isn’t against the law to eat “dinner” foods at dawn, and they’ll get your engine revved as well as traditional “breakfast” foods.
Eat everything—in moderation. Experts agree that as long as you don’t stuff yourself silly, there are no “bad” foods. “All food is health food in moderation,” says Victor Herbert, M.D., professor of medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center and Bronx Veterans Affairs Medical Center, both in New York City. “Any food is junk food in excess.”
*16/257/8*

Ziagen (Abacavir Sulfate)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Ziagen(AbacavirSulfate)
COLD AND CANKER SORES: SIMILAR BUT DIFFERENT
Cold sores, which appear on the outside of lips, come from a type of herpes virus chemically distinct from the genital sort. Most people develop immunities to cold sores as young children. But for some unknown reason 33 percent of us never acquire those immunities, meaning occasional cold sore outbreaks as adults. We’re not catching a new virus; rather, the old virus lies dormant in a facial nerve until something—stress, sunlight, certain foods, fever, a cold—weakens the body’s defenses, causing the sore to rear its ugly, oozing head.
Many know an outbreak is imminent when a tingling sensation in the mouth begins, usually 24 to 36 hours before the sore erupts in blisters about half the size of a pencil eraser. The blisters swell and rupture, oozing colorless fluid that forms a yellowish crust. The pain from a bursting blister can match that of a hard bite to your lip.
Like cold sores, canker sores usually pop up the day o a hot date, big meeting or crucial exam, but thankfully, they’re a lot less visible. They lurk inside the mouth on wet, moist surfaces, most often on the tongue, soft palate and inner cheek.
Canker sores usually begin as tiny blisters or painful red spots. Within a couple days the blister becomes an inflamed, woundlike ulcer. Exposed nerve endings in the canker sore are irritated by whatever in the mouth is salty, sour or scratchy— spicy dogs, cherry Slurpees, salted peanuts—and the contact can cause excruciating pain for some. “Some people have a pinpoint on their tongue and they complain so much you’d think they’d had major surgery,” said Louis Abbey, D.M.D., professor of oral pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry in Richmond. “Others have a mouthful of sores and they say they don’t hurt too badly.”
To prevent both canker and cold sores, doctors recommend reducing stress in your life. “People free of stress hardly ever get canker or cold sores,” Dr. Abbey notes. He recommends devising a stress management program—preventing sores is just one of many health benefits that could result.
*146/257/8*

Duovir-N (Lamivudine, Zidovudine, Nevirapine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Duovir-N(Lamivudine,Zidovudine,Nevirapine)
TOTAL MEN’S HEALTH: THE NUTS AND BOLTS OF AIDS
Almost the only way you can contract the virus that causes AIDS is through some risky behavior that leads to an exchange of body fluids.
“If you avoid risky behaviors, your chances of getting AIDS are pretty slim,” Herrell says.
To set the record straight, you can’t get AIDS from casual, nonsexual contact— from mosquitoes, toilet seats, pools, hot tubs or phones. Or even from repeated contact with an infected family member, including the sharing of utensils.
So how do you get AIDS? Through blood transfusions or exposure to HIV-infected blood or blood products. You can get it by using HIV-infected needles. Babies whose mothers are infected can get it via their shared bloodstream. And you can get it through risky sexual practices—far and away the most common mode of transmission.
Once the virus enters the body, it gradually dismantles the immune system. Initially, disease-fighting white blood cells are able to fight back and antibodies are made against the virus (when a man tests HIV-positive it means those antibodies have been found in his blood). But when the virus is inside a cell, it cannot be attacked by the antibodies. HIV-infected cells congregate in the lymph nodes, where they become virus factories, churning out new versions of HIV.
A man who is HIV-positive can remain healthy for niany years. But almost always, HIV persists in cell membranes, lying silently until—sometimes more than ten years after the initial infection—the viruses burst out of the lymph nodes, renew their assault on the immune system and cause AIDS. Ultimately, the virus triumphs and the man succumbs to a crushing array of opportunistic diseases such as pneumonia, tuberculosis and Kaposi’s sarcoma, a rare form of cancer, that take advantage of the body’s weakened defenses.
*27/257/8*