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Archive for the ‘Cancer’ Category

Vepesid (Etoposide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Vepesid(Etoposide)
COMING OFF DRUGS: WHAT MAKES PEOPLE HAVE BAD FEELINGS-YOU MAKE YOURSELF FEEL BAD
It is your thinking that makes you unhappy. It is your mind and its attitudes that make you fearful, anxious, angry, jealous or full of self-pity. And it is these faulty attitudes that make you unhappy.
Let’s look at another example. Suppose you decide that it’s time in your recovery to get a job. You see a suitable one advertised. You write in for it and get an interview. But after a few days you get a letter saying that you are not getting the job.
Your emotional reaction is a negative one. You feel depressed and angry and worthless all at once.
Have a closer look at these feelings. What are the thoughts in your head? Here are some of the things your mind is saying: ‘It’s not fair. I’m doing all I can to recover from addiction, and now I get this kind of set-back. That firm have no right to do that sort of thing to me. The rejection might have made me go back to using. I’ll never get a job at this rate. I am obviously worth nothing. I’m a hopeless, worthless human being.’
These negative thoughts are what are producing the anger, self-pity and bad feelings in you. What db they say about your inner attitudes?
Well, one of your attitudes is obviously that: ‘I am owed special favours because I gave up using drugs.’ Another attitude, and this is a dangerous one, is: ‘If things don’t go the way I want them to, I can use drugs again.’ And here’s another: ‘If at first I don’t succeed, it means I never will get anywhere.’ And here’s a real downer attitude: ‘Not getting this job means I am a bad, worthless, hopeless human being.’
All these attitudes are irrational. There’s nothing in the order of the universe which says that recovering addicts are entitled to special treatment. Indeed, there’s nothing in the universe which says life’s joys and problems are going to be distributed fairly to anybody. Fairness doesn’t come into it.
It’s also irrational to let yourself think that if things don’t go the way you want them, then you can use drugs. Who will suffer from that? Not the firm who failed to hire you. You will suffer.
Finally, the healthy attitude to disappointment is one that gets on with trying, as in the motto: ‘If at first you don’t succeed, try, try and try again.’ Being rejected for a job really says nothing about you as a human being. Maybe somebody better qualified turned up.
*116/116/2*

Droxia (Hydroxyurea)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Droxia(Hydroxyurea)
Other names: Hydrea
COMING OFF DRUGS: CHANGING ATTITUDES
Changing your attitudes will make you happier. It really will. Setbacks like not getting a job you wanted won’t leave you in a pit of self-pity, worthlessness and anger if you have the right attitude. With the right attitude to life, you will simply see if there’s anything that can be learned from the experience, then shrug your shoulders and get on with the next job interview.
Here are some healthy attitudes that will help you lead a happier life.
1. Accept that life isn’t fair. It isn’t fair to anybody. If you think you are having a bad time, just think of somebody aged twenty in a terminal cancer ward. Remember, self-pity leads back to using drugs. Every time the thought ‘It’s unfair!’ comes into your head, chase it out again. It’s childish thinking.
2. Set yourself realistic goals. It you can’t get what you want, start wanting what you can get. Part of recovery is learning to live with reality as it really is. And that means being realistic about yourself and what you can achieve. ‘It’s important to realise reality is reality and not what you want it to be,’ says a counsellor who helps people think realistically.
3. Allow yourself to make mistakes. Every human being makes mistakes and, what’s more, many of those mistakes are valuable experiences. Think it out for yourself. What do you learn from your successes? Not much. What do you learn from your mistakes? A great deal.
4. Drop the words ‘should’, ‘ought’, ‘must’ from your thinking. Reality simply doesn’t recognise these words. When you start thinking thoughts with these words in them, have a closer look at them.
Why ‘should’, ‘ought’, ‘must’ you? Who says so? You? Think again. There’s absolutely nothing in the universe which takes any notice of these ‘should’, ‘ought’, ‘must’ rules that you are imposing on yourself.
Sometimes they run absolutely counter to what reality is, like T ought to love my mother but I don’t.’ Sometimes they just impose a burden on you, like T must get that job.’ Reality isn’t how you think it ought to be. All those planets, galaxies and worlds simply don’t recognise one little addict’s petty self-imposed rules. Remember: ‘Reality is reality, not what you want it to be.’
5. Stop ‘awfulising”. It’s ‘awful’, ‘terrible’, ‘disastrous’, ‘horrifying’. Really? Is it really awful compared with, say, millions of people dying from famine in Africa? Is it terrible compared with dying from leukaemia or lung cancer, or spending your life in a wheelchair? Is it disastrous compared with the havoc caused by an earthquake or a volcano? You know it isn’t anything of the kind. Every time you exaggerate in your thinking like this, you make things worse. Bring yourself back to reality by trying to see things in their proper perspective.
6. Let go of making yourself feel bad. If you have a problem that is worrying or angering you, take a careful look at it. Identify exactly what you are allowing to bug you. If there’s some action you can take today, take it. Then stop worrying or angering yourself about it and let the problem go.
Literally stop the thoughts. Worrying or getting angry about something you cannot change is simply a waste of thinking power. It clutters up your head with unwanted rubbish. Every time this kind of rubbish thought comes into your head, chase it out with something else. Take realistic actions and change your mental focus from the problem to something quite different.
You can help yourself let go of things by talking about them at a meeting, talking to your sponsor, handing them over in prayer. One recovering addict uses this “mental trick. She takes the whatever is worrying her, imagines it being wrapped up in a paper parcel, then posts it into a kind of imaginary celestial letter box. Another recovering alcoholic simply finds a suffering newcomer to help, in order to stop being obsessive about her own problems. Ask around NA or AA and you’ll find other people have ways of letting go which may help you.
7. See things from other people’s points of view. Take yourself out of the centre of your myopic mental frame and look at things through their eyes. It’s surprising what a different mental landscape you’ll see.
Take the bus conductor who was rude to you today. Before you snap back, imagine what his day may have been like. He had a disagreement with his family at breakfast, arrived at the bus garage to find his shift altered, and has just had a row with somebody trying to evade the proper fare. So he was rude to you, but you weren’t really his target. He’d have been rude to the next passenger whoever it was. So it’s not worth taking so personally.
8. Don’t expect too much from others. Just because people are not addicts or alcoholics does not mean that they are saints. The world is full of different kinds of people, and quite a few of them are emotionally immature. You can’t expect rational responses from emotionally ill people.
9. Don’t let other people press your buttons. You can choose your reactions to others in the same way that you can choose your attitudes. If somebody is angry to you, you need not be angry back. You do not have to pick up his anger.
*117/116/2*

Alkeran (Melphalan)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Alkeran(Melphalan)
SOME FACTS ABOUT SKIN CANCER
Sun worshipping has long been the hallmark of the Australian culture. Not surprisingly, Australia has the highest incidence of skin cancer in the world and the number of cases continues to rise despite increased awareness of the problem.
Skin cancer is also the most common form of cancer in Australians, yet is the most preventable. Each year 1000 Australians die of skin cancer. As well, 140000 people are treated for skin cancers each year, costing the community over 100 million dollars. The risk of developing skin cancer increases with age, and is greater than fifty per cent in those over sixty-five. The incidence of skin cancer is increasing all over the world, particularly in warmer climates. This is related partly to the depletion of the ozone layer, but also to our outdoor recreational lifestyles.
Skin cancer is very visible, so it can be detected early. Early detection leads to complete cure with minimal disability. The Anti-Cancer Council must be congratulated for their work; many people are now aware of what skin cancers look like, so early detection and early treatment are now much more common. However, many others, especially men over sixty-five, still develop advanced skin cancer which can be life threatening because they ignore or do not detect the early warning signs.
*1/150/5*

Xeloda (Capecitabine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
COMING OFF DRUGS: LEARNING TO CARE FOR OTHERS-PARTNERS, WIVES AND HUSBANDS
Most partners are overjoyed when their addict or alcoholic stops drinking or using drugs and joins AA or NA. But some, just like the family of the addict, remain suspicious. They have been so hurt that it takes time and the continued recovery of their partner before they can trust again.
Partners also sometimes feel very jealous of AA or NA. For years they have been trying to get their partners off drink and drugs, and it is wounding for them to see another succeeding where they have apparently failed. This is made worse when the addict or alcoholic seems to spend more time at meetings than he or she did drinking or taking drugs.
Of course, if partners go to Al-anon or Families Anonymous they will begin to understand what is happening and that it is the programme of recovery that helps addicts and alcoholics if they accept it. But, once again, you cannot force your partner to attend, any more than he or she could force you to stop taking drugs or drink.
Most upsetting of all to a recovering addict or alcoholic is the relationship which breaks up after recovery. Yet the sad truth is that a few people do not like their addict or alcoholic when he or she is well. Consciously or unconsciously, they preferred them sick. It is a fact that a significant percentage of relationships break up when the alcoholic or addict stops using drink or drugs. Partners no longer feel needed. They are so damaged that they cannot handle an equal relationship.
Louis, a recovering alcoholic, was married to a social worker. ‘She didn’t like me as a rolling around 24-hours-a-day drunk, and at first when I sobered up in AA we went through a honeymoon period. It was wonderful.
Then things started to go wrong. I wouldn’t let her manipulate me. I started saying to her: “Don’t you think you should consult me about this?” A kind of power battle started up. She wanted to keep the role of family fixer, or be the one who copes with everything.

Rheumatrex (Methotrexate)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Rheumatrex(Methotrexate)
COMING OFF DRUGS: LEARNING TO CARE FOR OTHERS-DRUGS AND DRINK IN OTHERS
Sometimes when relationships do not get better it is because there is a problem of drink or drugs in the family or in the partner. When you were using drugs or drinking yourself, you probably did not notice it. Now you are clean and sober, this kind of problem may become evident.
Recovering addicts and alcoholics sometimes think other people are not chemically dependent unless the other’s pattern of using drugs or drinking is similar to their own. They are so anxious not to imagine the illness in others that they are often slow to recognise it.
Many addicts come from families where there is a drinking problem or a hidden problem of tranquilliser dependence. If this is the case, other drug users or drinkers may be far from enthusiastic about your recovery. Seeing you clean and sober makes them feel worse about their continued drug-taking or drinking. Because they feel so bad about themselves, they may sneer at NA or AA. They may even try to persuade you that alcohol or the wrongly named ‘soft’ drugs cannot hurt you.
Alison is somebody who discovered that there was a drink problem in her family. ‘My mother probably has a drinking problem. I told her about AA and she was horrified. It was one and a half years after I’d joined, and I tried to talk to her about it. But it was no use.
‘She’s always tried to make me drink again. When I come to visit her, she’ll be at the door saying “Red or white wine, darling?” Or she’ll offer pate and say “Lovely plate. Lots of brandy in it!” and I’ll say “Ma, I really can’t eat this.” Last time we went to dinner, she produced a pudding and said: “Dig down deep. Lots of lovely alcohol at the bottom.” It’s the thing I dislike most. I find it so hurtful.’
Some newly recovering addicts, enthusiastic about NA’s power to help others recover, go all out to try to ‘convert’ the family member who is drinking or taking drugs. They are surprised, upset and even resentful when their offers of help are refused.
They have to realise that they cannot force their family into recovery – just as their family could not force them. In the first year of their own recovery it is best for them to concentrate on getting well themselves. Later, when they have some solid months of staying clean and sober behind them, they will probably find that Families Anonymous or Al-anon can help their relationship with the drug user or drinker.
*121/116/2*

Arimidex (Anastrozole)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Arimidex(Anastrozole)
Other names: Abilify
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: THE DANCER
From the start I was fighting mad at life and at my parents. It was a constant battle of their will versus mine, and I hated them for being right. But underneath the hate, I loved them. My food problem, which reflected my approach to life, started early. My weight was not affected, however, because I was very active. At six, I worshipped the dance teacher next door. She had a gorgeous figure and I wanted to grow up to have a body like hers. My mother suggested that I take lessons, and thus began my career as a dancer. My life was soon entirely dedicated to dancing. I was either taking lessons, teaching or performing. The best part of appearing in shows was the free food afterward. And all I really cared about after a day of teaching was getting to the candy machine and the fast-food stores. I felt tired and lazy most of the time. I practiced grudgingly only because my mother insisted that if I wanted to be a good dancer I would have to work at it. I began taking my mother’s diet pills and loved feeling alert and energetic. I counted calories, weighed myself obsessively every day and became very thin. After graduating from high school, I left home to dance at state fairs with a tour group. I finally had time and money to do as I wanted, but all I wanted to do was eat and sleep. I wound up breaking my diet every day. Having convinced myself that I felt superior to the other dancers, I was quite happy to be alone with my food. The diet pills kept me on a superficial high during working hours, but by the end of the summer they were losing their effectiveness. I gained 25 pounds. My costumes were splitting and the boss was about to fire me. I found stronger diet pills and got my figure back, then entered the “Miss Dance of America” contest. I scored highest in my performance, but I was so nervous I flubbed my interview with the judges and was awarded runner-up instead of the title. New York City was the place to be to pursue my career so I moved there. In the next few years I had one job after another, coming close to getting fired from each one on account of gaining weight and being habitually late. One night I came face to face with the real nature of my sickness. At four in the morning I threw a coat over my nightgown and raced to an all-night food store where I talked them into letting me take the food on credit. Returning to my apartment, I started shaking in the elevator, unable to wait. I ripped open the carton of ice cream and began digging into it with my teeth like an animal. Nothing mattered but to eat as much as I could as fast as possible. I didn’t even feel guilty, just void of thought. Finally, it seemed to be over. I was nauseated, disgusted and so numb that I didn’t care. But the obsession came back. I had to give in just to get through the night. I returned to the store and again I couldn’t eat the stuff fast enough. At last, I fell into a drugged stupor and slept for about twelve hours. I woke up with a confused silence in my mind, bewildered and afraid. I had a bloated hangover — my face was puffed up and I felt ugly and ashamed. I knew I was like an alcoholic or an addict with food but I didn’t know what to do except to start another diet. I cleaned up, took a diet pill and felt hope slowly coming back. “Binging is not where it’s at,” I observed to myself. “It’s definitely a nowhere road.” I wound up binging the whole day. There were many nights like that. When I grew noticeably fat, the director threatened to fire me if I didn’t lose weight. In a panic, I vowed never to do it again. But the conflict was too great. Each time, my weight went a little higher. Between jobs, it soared. I had developed the art of people pleasing and got along with almost everyone (except bosses) in a surface way, but I felt that something was very wrong underneath. Whenever I visited my family we had screaming arguments. They couldn’t understand how anyone in New York could like me. It was as if I were two different people. My involvements with the opposite sex were as messed up as the rest of my life. I had one bad love affair after another, pushing relationships to an end or becoming overly dependent. Either way, I ended up alone with my food.
I quit using amphetamines after my last show business job and gained 60 pounds. I tried every new diet I could find, went to hypnotists, psychiatrists and a fasting farm, but nothing could stop me. When I saw people I knew on the street, I hid in shame. I became almost violent if my parents or others who loved me tried to help. I hated myself and wished I would die. I couldn’t understand what other people saw in life. What made them want to get up in the morning? What motivated them?
My parents told me about a television program on Overeaters Anonymous. It sounded good, but I didn’t want the answer to come from my parents. I was enrolled in a commercial diet club (for the third time) and insisted it was going to work. After a week on the diet club regimen, I started hinging. Finally, I gave up and went to an OA meeting. From the start, I knew that this was the answer for me. It was different from a diet club. Weight was not the main issue. They were talking about a whole way of approaching life. They also kept mentioning God and a Higher Power, which turned me off, though I tried to be open to the idea. I had never believed in God — or in anything. I began to see that this was my problem. It seemed impossible to stay abstinent. I hated to tell my sponsor that I had done it again, but I forced myself to be honest. The binging went on for eight months. Then one day, the latest “new beginning” turned out to be the last one. I have abstained, one day at a time, ever since. It has been four and a half years, and it is still a precious miracle to me that I can enjoy my food without eating or craving more. I believe that my abstinence is a gift which I finally became ready to accept and appreciate — a gift I am willing to go to any lengths to keep. The program has shown me what to do to avoid a binge. Just for this one day I can do it, with help. I have lost 60 pounds, but I believe I am just as capable of slipping now as ever, so I try to stay grateful and to develop my dependence on God instead of food.
Without the food to hide behind, I began to see how afraid I was of life and people. But when I reached out, people were there for me, giving me loving support instead of rejecting me. It has been a steady process of deepening trust and of growing to love myself and others, even with defects.
I did not return to show business after I began abstinence. I chose, instead, to join the business world. During the first two years, I came close to being fired because of the negativity and anger which I could no longer suppress with food. But working the OA program has changed my personality and attitudes. Now I enjoy being responsible and trustworthy. Small accomplishments such as getting to work on time make me feel good.
For a while, my life was built completely around OA and my job. I still attend meetings and sponsor people, but I have gradually opened up to other activities. I have begun developing friendships with men based on honesty rather than fantasies and games. Even my relationship with my parents is improving. I recently tried skydiving, which I would never have considered before OA. Throwing myself out into the sky for all I was worth was the ultimate moment of trust in God and myself!
I never knew life could be like this. I have no idea where it will lead except that, if I stay abstinent, it will be in a positive direction. None of this would have happened if I had given up during those first months of OA when I was still binging. The most important thing I heard in those meetings was, “Keep coming back!” Thank God I did.
*8/245/2*

Cytoxan (Cyclophosphamide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Cytoxan(Cyclophosphamide)
COMING OFF DRUGS: A HEALTHY MIND AND ALTERED ATTITUDES-NAME THEM, OWN THEM, DUMP THEM
If you are going to be happy as well as free from, drugs you will need to do a considerable amount of work on yourself. As we have said earlier, addicts who want to stay off drugs and live happy lives will have to alter many of their attitudes.
Let’s look a little closer at this business of changing attitudes. It is at the heart of successful recovery. By now, if you have been clean for several weeks, the chances are that all kinds of feelings are coming back to you. Some of these feelings are pleasant – joy, laughter, caring. Others are extremely unpleasant. These are feelings like anger, jealousy, self-pity, depression and anxiety. Sometimes these feelings simmer away inside you and you are not even sure what they are.
Name them, own them, dump them-If you are feeling unhappy or restless or ill at ease, the first thing to do is’ to look at yourself and ask yourself: ‘What is going on? What are my feelings at this moment?’
Identify the emotion. Is it anxiety? Perhaps things are not going right in your life and you are worrying about the future. Is it resentment? Are you going over something in your mind that makes you feel angry?
Now admit to yourself, ‘Yes, that is what I am feeling.’ One of the reasons why people stay very uncomfortable in themselves is that they don’t admit to their feelings. Through clenched teeth they say things like ‘Of course, I’m not angry but. . .’
Once you have admitted what it is that you are feeling, you can get rid of the uncomfortable feelings by talking about them at meetings, phoning your sponsor and in general getting them out into the open and dumping them.
But these measures, excellent though they are, are only temporary ones. In the long run, in order to lead a contented life, you must take action to prevent the negative feelings arising in the first place.
*114/116/2*

Eulexin (Flutamide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Eulexin(Flutamide)
HEADACHES FROM HELL: LIFE-THREATENING HEADACHES
Among the range of life-threatening conditions in which headache may be a symptom are:
stroke (a blockage in the blood supply to the brain) — usually due to either an arterial clot or fatty deposit of arterial plaque;
subarachnoid haemorrhage — caused by a rupture in the brain arterial system which forces blood into the cavity between the brain and the skull;
brain tumour—brain tumours only rarely present as a dull or throbbing headache, but may sometimes do so;
hypertension — blood pressure can sometimes be so high that it causes headache, often accompanied by blurred vision;
temporal arteritis — in which the arteries which run up the side of the skull become inflamed, causing severe head pain to one side of the head. This pain will usually be around the temple which becomes sensitive to touch; and
head injuries — in which headache symptoms may develop immediately or within 48 hours.
Although this final category of life-threatening disease makes up only a very small sector of the whole class of headache types, it is important to realise that any headache can be potentially dangerous by virtue of being neglected.
If a headache is indicative of a serious underlying disease such as a brain tumour or blood clot, the head pain will generally remain relatively constant and confined to one small area of the head. Most non-life-threatening headaches experienced do not pinpoint any particular area of the head.
If a pattern of recurring, non-local headaches does occur, however, it is always best to consult a doctor for further diagnosis. Additionally, if a headache occurs in any of the following circumstances, it is wise to have this headache history immediately analysed by a medical professional:
a headache commences without warning;
a headache occurs after a recent sore throat or head injury;
a headache is accompanied by fever, a stiff neck, rash, seizures, double vision, mental confusion, numbness or weakness; or
if you experience chronic, progressive headaches which worsen after coughing, exertion or straining.
*7/107/2*

Leukeran (Chlorambucil)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Leukeran(Chlorambucil)
COMING OFF DRUGS: LEARNING TO CARE FOR OTHERS-FAMILY REACTIONS
Most families have been through a gamut of emotions as they watched their loved one sinking into chemical dependence. They have suffered from despair, anger, frustration and guilt. Months, sometimes years, of pressure on the family have caused them to become emotionally damaged themselves.
If the family has joined Families Anonymous or Al-anon, they will recognise this damage to themselves and will be recovering while their addict recovers. They will be getting on with their own lives and they will understand what is happening to the addict.
Families who refuse to go to these organisations, however, may stay in almost total ignorance of the illness of chemical dependence. Just as they did not understand it when you were using drugs, so they do not understand your recovery.
They may greet the joyful news that you are in NA or AA and recovering a day at a time with downright disbelief or suspicious scepticism. You may find that they are still checking up on you or treating you as if you were still on drugs or still drinking.
Before you react with childish anger, think about it from their point of view. After all, they’ve heard your promises many times before. They’ve exhausted themselves hoping this really would be the last time you took drugs or drank. They’ve been through the despair of realising your promises weren’t kept. They have listened to the innumerable lies you told them while you were using drugs or drinking.
Why should they believe you now? You know it’s different this time, because you understand about NA and the programme, but they don’t understand it. They may even be wildly suspicious of the idea that recovering addicts or alcoholics can help each other. Many people who have never gone to a public NA or AA meeting are suspicious.
If this is their attitude, stop trying to persuade, coax or bully them into understanding. Words just won’t help. They may listen, but it’s as if they can’t hear. But deeds will get through. Over the next few months you can demonstrate how it works by staying clean and by getting on with your recovery. They may not believe what you say, but they will believe what they see with their own eyes. Don’t play the game ‘How Can I Stay Sober If You Don’t Trust Me?’ As the months pass, their scepticism will disappear and they will be delighted to see you changing before their very eyes.
*119/116/2*

Casodex (Bicalutamide)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Casodex(Bicalutamide)
HEADACHES FROM HELL: INFECTION HEADACHES
One of the most dangerous classes of head pain arises from infection. Almost any infection may give rise to head pain, but sinusitis is one of the most common causes.
When the sinuses become blocked or infected, the pressure
inside them increases, causing pain towards the front of the head,
forehead and eyes. A simple but not foolproof test of whether your
head pain is due to sinusitis can be performed by lowering your
head between your knees to see if the pain increases.
Sinusitis may be caused, by exposure to contaminants in the air, as in the case of car or industrial fumes, or in the out-gassing of plastics, glues, synthetic carpet fibres and so on, observed in ‘sick building syndrome’. There are simple steps you can take to alleviate this problem.
Try not to have your desk near the photocopier at work, avoid jogging or cycling in heavily trafficked streets and make sure you get regular bouts of fresh air (as opposed to the air-conditioned variety). The key here is fresh air, as pollution can exacerbate or contribute to sinus problems.
Allergy may be another cause of infection leading to headache, as can bacterial infections accompanying colds or the flu virus. If you believe that your headaches may be caused by an allergy, there is much you can do to prevent the problem. Many people find that the elimination of dairy products from their diet may be helpful, as they tend to be mucus-producing, thereby contributing to blocked sinuses.
When allergies persist and give rise to accompanying headaches, seek the advice of an enlightened doctor and find out whether complementary therapies such as acupuncture or aromatherapy can help.
One form of infection associated with severe headache is meningitis, an inflammation of the tissues which surround the brain. Although meningitis occurs rarely, if not diagnosed quickly, it can rapidly lead to death, especially in children. In addition to the presence of a severe headache, one of the discriminating factors of meningitis is a stiff neck, accompanied by nausea or vomiting. If you suspect meningitis, call your doctor at once. If the sufferer finds it. impossible or extremely difficult to touch the chin to the chest, you have good reason to be suspicious, so do not delay in getting help.
*6/107/2*

Nolvadex (Tamoxifen)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Nolvadex(Tamoxifen)
COMING OFF DRUGS: LEARNING TO CARE FOR OTHERS
Even for somebody trying their hardest to change their attitudes, some aspects of life remain difficult. It’s sometimes quite easy to practise the principles of a new life in the world outside, but very difficult to practise them in the home.
The family and its relationships are often a persistent source of difficulty to recovering addicts. Most addicts come into NA or AA with their relationships in tatters. Drugs have come between them and friends, family and partners. Indeed, drugs have often destroyed their ability to express care for others.
As we have said, addicts prefer to get stoned in company, and sometimes drug users will even introduce their younger brothers and sisters to drugs. They only think of their own selfish needs and do not stop to think of the possible outcome.
It is little wonder, therefore, that by the time addicts reach NA or AA there is a trail of broken relationships and emotional damage to others in the past. Drug addiction harms not only the addicts, but also those around them. Indeed, specialists call drug dependence a family illness because of the emotional damage to all those around the addict or alcoholic.
*118/116/2*