Language
Pills Search
Language
Categories
  • +Anti-Allergic/Asthma (33)
  • Anti-Depressant (39)
  • +Anti-Herpes (2)
  • +Anti-Infectives (31)
  • +Anti-Smoking (2)
  • +Antibiotics (43)
  • +Cancer (11)
  • +Cardio & Blood (95)
  • +Diabetes (23)
  • +Epilepsy (7)
  • +Gastrointestinal (22)
  • +General Health (50)
  • +Hair Loss (1)
  • +Healthy Bones (20)
  • +Herbals (5)
  • +HIV (7)
  • +Hormonal (1)
  • +Men’s Health (17)
  • +Mental Disorders (9)
  • +Pain Relief/Muscle Relaxant (45)
  • +Parkinson And Alzheimer (7)
  • +Sexual Health (2)
  • +Skin Care (16)
  • +Weight Loss (6)
  • +Women’s Health (37)

Archive for the ‘Anti-Depressant’ Category

Reboxetine

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
MENTAL HEALTH: FINDING HELP FOR DEPRESSION
Every October since 1992, thousands of Americans have made a move to improve their lives by going to a free screening for depression, one of the most common and deadly diseases in America. Left untreated, depression ends in suicide for one in seven with the illness, says Dr. Douglas G. Jacobs, the Harvard psychiatrist who created the screening project.
Sponsors of the National Depression Screening Day each year invite 100,000 people to show up at more than 1,800 sites nationwide. Sites include hospitals, clinics, schools, churches, military stations, and even shopping malls.
As of 1996, Dr. Jacobs calculates that 8,000 depressed Americans probably would have died by their own hands had they not attended a screening. “Their symptoms were so severe,” he says, “that the attending physicians recommended immediate treatment or hospitalization.” The screenings also save many others from the terrible day-to-day effects of milder forms of depression.
The National Institute of Mental Health found that 80 percent of those screened each year are “clinically depressed,” Dr. Jacobs says. Data also show the most prevalent symptoms were psychological-such as a sense of hopelessness or joylessness-rather than physical.
“We had always expected depressed people to report mostly body symptoms like fatigue, weight loss, sleep troubles, and restlessness,” Dr. Jacobs explains. “I hope that doctors will now be paying more attention to the patient’s mental state. The most important and deadliest sign is a patient’s statement that he or she wants to commit suicide.”
Depression is not hopeless. New and old treatments work better for depression than treatments for most other mental diseases. Powerful antidepressants may be used to keep the illness at bay. Psychotherapy, the “talking cure,” is effective for many. Even if the patient is on the threshold of suicide, medication and psychotherapy are effective. For those patients who do not respond, there are alternative treatments, including the modern form of electroconvulsive therapy – a safe treatment for the most serious forms of depression.
*1/266/5*

Depakote (Divalproex)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Depakote(Divalproex)
DEALING WITH THE CAUSE OF INSOMNIA: CHANGING THE PATTERN
A popular way of treating insomnia today is a behavioural psychology method called stimulus-control, which consists of retraining yourself to sleep by learning to associate bed and bedtime with sleep, and sleep alone. This is the routine:
Use your bed and bedroom for sleep only. Don’t watch television, listen to the radio, read, work, smoke or eat in bed. Making love is of course permitted!
Always get up at the same time, including weekends and holidays. Lie-ins may be tempting, but if you take more sleep than you need on Sunday morning it’ll be harder to get to sleep on Sunday night.
If you find waking up really difficult, place your alarm clock at the other side of the room so that you have to get up to turn it off. Put the light on straight away, as light can stimulate wakefulness.
Don’t take naps during the day. You can overcome post-lunch sleepiness with some deep breathing, or a quick walk round the block.
Don’t go to bed until you are really sleepy.
If you don’t fall asleep within ten minutes, get up and do something else in another room. Don’t go back to bed until you are ready to fall asleep. The same applies if you wake up in the middle of the night for any length of time. Don’t associate your bedroom with lying awake. Get up, make yourself a hot drink if you like — milk or herbal tea, but not coffee or ordinary tea. Read, or write letters, until you are ready to go to sleep again. (Some people do quite a lot of creative work in the middle of the night and don’t miss their sleep at all.)
This method doesn’t necessarily suit everybody, but some studies show that it can be successful. In one trial a group of elderly insomniacs with an average age of 67 were able to reduce their time for falling asleep from an average of over an hour to half an hour.
There are further sleep-assisting habits you can develop:
Deal with specific anxieties during the day or early evening.
Avoid stimulating foods and drinks in the evening. These include coffee, tea and alcohol. Smoking is also a stimulant; if you can’t give it up immediately, at least cut down, especially in the evening.
Avoid stimulating activities late at night, including strenuous exercise, work, and arguments.
Establish a winding-down routine before you go to bed.
Spend the last hour before bedtime preparing for sleep, in-
cluding some relaxation and a warm bath.
Make sure your bedroom is both well-aired and warm.
A word about naps
for good sleepers, daytime naps can be beneficial and restorative; as we’ve seen, the human body clock actually seems built for sleep twice a day. However, while you are recovering a normal sleep pattern, naps are best avoided. The exception here would be parents of new babies, who are not technically insomniac, but are getting broken nights. If you are elderly and the need for a daytime nap becomes overpowering, take it but remember to allow for less sleep at night.
*21/169/2*

Lexapro (Escitalopram)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Lexapro(Escitalopram)
EMPLOYING SAFETY GOGGLES
A young racquetball player from Peoria, Illinois, Marcie O’Shaunessy, had her eye cut open when her opponent’s racquet struck and smashed her eyeglasses. Luckily for Marcie, surgical repair saved her vision. Now she is back playing racquetball, but she always makes sure to wear special impact-resistant safety goggles ground to her prescription.
Such an accident to one or both eyes is not uncommon in sports activities, since Americans are exceedingly competitive and exercise conscious. Each year, over 35,000 people suffer eye injuries that impair vision. Ophthalmologists have noted an alarming increase in eye traumas, especially during these summer months. Tennis, hockey, cycling, basketball, football, and other recreational activities are the culprits. Yet, the National Society to Prevent Blindness has indicated that ninety percent of all eye injuries can be prevented with proper safety equipment or, as a result of accidents happening out of uncorrected visual impairment, with refractive surgery or external visual aids.
Sports eye protectors, which are goggle-type molded eye-guards, with or without corrected lenses are most useful. They can be made with one’s prescription built in. A full lens is recommended for badminton, cycling, yard work, woodworking, and other do-it-yourself ventures. They may be acquired from eye doctors, sporting goods stores, racquet clubs, and opticians.
Ophthalmologist Paul F. Vinger, M.D. of Lexington, Massachusetts suggested that the best protection is offered by optical quality polycarbonate lenses, which can withstand very high-intensity blows. One such product, Action Eyes, is made by Bausch & Lomb. Another is called Pro-tek Gargoyles and is injection-molded, wraparound, light-weight, shatterproof eye protectors with clear or sunglass tint, useful for skiing and cycling as well as racquet sports.
Dr. Vinger also recommended that safety goggles should be worn when trimming shrubs, using a power mower or workshop tools, or spraying paint or pesticides. Goggles can protect your eyes from the irritating smoke of a barbecue.
With some non-contact sports such as track and bicycling you’re able to participate wearing eyeglasses or contact lenses. With others such as swimming, diving, gymnastics, karate, judo, and more, corrective lenses are impossible to use. Surely permanent refractive correction with the newest medical breakthrough, which the author has named “high-tech vision,” is of vital importance to those sportspersons who are nearsighted, farsighted, or have astigmatism but can’t use external aids for their vision.
Besides the newly introduced refractive surgical techniques, contacts and spectacles have been the two main forms of correction for difficulties with one’s cornea. Special lenses may have been recommended for your particular sport or occupation. For example, a golfer could order special eyeglasses that possess built-in corrections for addressing the ball and another lens change for watching the ball wing its way down the fairway. Target and trap shooters might wear specially made eyeglasses for seeing their gun sights and a second correction for visualizing the targets afar. These types of external aids are called functional eyeglasses. They can be tailored for the individualized seeing requirements of your sport or hobby.
But now these gimmick glasses and contacts no longer are necessary, for a technologically perfect procedure has been developed to correct nearsightedness.
*41/127/5*

Clozaril (Clozapine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Clozaril(Clozapine)
A SPECTRUM OF SEVERITY: MILD BDD
But most people with BDD don’t get into serious accidents or act in self-destructive ways. Like Sarah, those with milder BDD live relatively normal lives. They work, see friends, date, and raise families. I treat college students who get good grades and graduate, homemakers who successfully juggle raising children and running a home, accountants who meet their deadlines, and doctors who give their patients superb care. Many people with this disorder are productive; some are very high achievers. All of them suffer, but they manage, sometimes well.
A psychiatrist colleague of mine wondered if one of her patients had BDD but thought it unlikely because he was functioning so well. This colleague had treated several other people with BDD whose symptoms had severely impaired their functioning and she consequently thought that all people with BDD had extreme difficulties with work, socializing, and other aspects of life. But it turned out that the patient in question, who was a college professor, did in fact have BDD. He managed to perform well at work because of the effort he made to stay focused on his work and to keep his symptoms from interfering. The professor, however, viewed his functioning as less than optimal. He hadn’t applied for a job he’d wanted because he feared he’d be turned down because of his “awful” appearance. And he’d refused a promotion that would require more work because his preoccupations were so taxing. “Even though I’m very high functioning and successful,” he explained, “I’m not working up to my capacity, although no one would ever know it.”
*20/204/8*

5-HTP

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
SECOND STAGE OF STRESS BREAKDOWN: USING THE WILL-POWER TO IGNORE FEELINGS OF ANXIETY
Looked at objectively, the use of will-power mechanisms to ignore a signal which is a warning of overload of the nervous system, would seem foolish, and expensive. It is. However, some people make a habit of doing just that. They have been trained to ignore body feelings of tension and anxiety, and to suppress open display of emotion.
Many different cultures set out deliberately to train young people to do this, placing great value on keeping a stiff upper hp. During World War II, the personality characteristic of being able to endure stressful circumstances, feeling fear and anxiety but not outwardly showing it, was considered a desirable quality for selecting people for aircraft crew. However, an undesirable side-effect of selecting unflappable people to fly aircraft and drop bombs in situations of great peril, was the selection of a number of people who had the potential to break down quite suddenly.
My understanding of the case histories of pilots and other air crew, who broke down under combat stress, is that these men habitually kept their emotions in check until they ran right out of inhibitory reserve and then, quite unexpectedly, they broke down. This is not to say that these people were any more or any less capable of carrying out their duties while under severe life-threatening stress than others who tended instead to express their anxiety and fear.
The airmen, who were able to suppress displays of emotion, gave their superiors no hint of warning before their breakdowns. On the other hand, those who displayed their feelings of anxiety readily tended to be grounded because their superiors felt they might break down and become unreliable and inefficient under further stress. For this reason, the men with stoic personalities were over- used and put at risk for sudden breakdown. On the other hand, the anxious worriers were not over-used and tended therefore to be less susceptible to breakdown under stress.
*17/129/5*

Tofranil (Imipramine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Tofranil(Imipramine)
PANIC ATTACKS
Panic attacks are a form of anxiety disorder. They are characterized by sudden, recurrent, short lived attacks of intense anxiety. These attacks are often accompanied by the fear of open spaces which is described as agoraphobia. Sometimes the episodes run in families and they are much more frequent in young females.
The medical management of panic attacks is aided by the availability of Tricyclic antidepressants. These drugs are particularly effective in the treatment of panic disorders. The use of Valium like drugs is not recommended. One third of patients prescribed Benzodiazepines become physically addicted. They have problems during withdrawal and withdrawal is often mistaken for the recurrence of panic attacks.
Home Remedies
Regular exercise reduces anxiety and makes it easy to go to sleep. Breathing exercises and isometrics add further to a reduction in anxiety. There is also a place for mental discipline. Mind control can be mastered through the use of stress management techniques. Take up yoga, Zen or Tai chi. All of these oriental disciplines combine both physical and mental techniques that aid in the reduction of anxiety.
*4/131/5*

Haldol (Haloperidol)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
FOOD AND NUTRITION: INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
The Agency for International Development (AID) of the U.S. Department of State and numerous charitable organizations are pledged to providing aid in many ways: direct food supplies; technical assistance in the development of agriculture and industry; education of youth; education of homemakers in food preparation, child care, and sanitation; and many other ways. Several organizations of the United Nations illustrate the humanitarian efforts of the great international body.
The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) aims especially to improve the growth, distribution, and storage of food. To carry out its aims it might be involved in such widely different activities as irrigation for crops; development of varieties of grain that will grow in a given climate; sponsoring home economics programs to show people how to prepare their foods and to better feed their families; and setting up a food processing plant.
The World Health Organization (WHO) aims to eliminate diseases of all kinds, including those that relate to nutrition. It works closely with FAO. Diseases such as malaria and others keep millions from working. When people are treated for these diseases they are able to work and produce food for themselves and their families. WHO works closely with communities to improve the sanitation through insect control, water supplies, housing, and waste disposal.
The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is concerned with all aspects of the health and welfare of children everywhere. Some of its activities include the distribution of nonfat dry milk; immunization of children; provision of tools and seeds for gardening programs; school materials; development of safe water supplies; and many others.
The United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) aims to eliminate illiteracy and thus to help people through education to use science and to understand cultural forces for the improvement of their lives.
*10/234/5*

Atarax (Hydroxyzine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Atarax(Hydroxyzine)
DEALING WITH THE CAUSE OF INSOMNIA: SLEEP AND HABIT
If your insomnia has become severe enough or prolonged enough for you to be reading this book, then it is in part a habit, perhaps alongside some other habits, like not looking after yourself well enough, or postponing dealing with anxieties. And short-term insomnia can become long-term insomnia simply by acquiring the habit of expecting to sleep badly. Human beings are odd creatures: most of us like to think we are independent, free-thinking spirits. Yet a surprising amount of our behaviour is totally conditioned, starting when we are very young. Much of our conditioning is helpful and life-supporting; it would be very inconvenient if every time you crossed a road you had to relearn the desirability of looking both ways, or what red, amber and green lights mean. Unfortunately the mechanical part of our brain absorbs other, less helpful lessons, like associating bed with lying awake.
It’s common these days for the brain to be likened to a computer — a computer more vast and complex than any yet built, and of course with a capacity for original thought, but nonetheless a machine which obediently reproduces whatever programming is fed into it.
Thus a few people are ‘sleep hypochondriacs’; early in life an over-anxious parent has programmed them with the idea that without eight hours’ solid sleep their health will suffer. The computer part of the brain that has accepted this belief reacts with anxiety when those solid eight hours aren’t forthcoming — until the owner of the computer takes a fresh look at the old programme and decides to delete it and feed in new, up-to-date information.
Of course, we are more than our brains, and our brains are much more than computers; but the image is useful in that a computer is amenable to instruction by the person in charge — you. The mechanical part of our thinking is intended as a tool, not a hindrance, and you have the power to change your unwanted programmes for more useful ones.
If your insomnia has an emotional basis, you may need to deal with that too. Meanwhile, how you think and talk to yourself may be creating a habit out of what could be a temporary problem.
*18/169/2*

Effexor (Venlafaxine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Effexor(Venlafaxine)
HYPERACTIVE CHILDREN: CASE HISTORIES
There are some very moving case histories in from the files of the Hyperactive Children’s Support Group.
‘Anthony’s improved with evening primrose oil. If this is so effective, why oh why can’t doctors use it?
‘Anthony sat on my knee and watched television, cuddled up. This is the first time since he was born and he is four in September . . .’
‘Anastasia is greatly changed: aged 5% when she started Efamol etc. She learned to read and swim, to tie her laces, began judo, ballet and gymnastics and wets the bed far less often. She is a far happier child now.’
‘There has indubitably been a dramatic improvement in Gerald’s school results, such improvement coinciding exactly with the commencement of the treatment (supplements). The school assesses children fortnightly on a scale which ranges from -7 to +7 for the total work. Prior to the treatment Gerald had never achieved a mark above 0 and was normally around -4 to -5. After starting the treatment his first assessment was +2 and subsequent assessments have been +3 or +З 1/2. He has even for the first time been picked for school sports teams and a solo in a musical concert. Gerald received a prize for the “most improved” child in the school this term.’
Jonathan is the son of a single mother, who ran out of evening primrose oil partly due to the cost. This is her story of what happened when Jonathan stopped taking his supplements:
‘For those 10 days (when he was without his oil etc.) I had noticed that he had dark circles under his eyes, the old white complexion, hyperactivity, stupid, cheeky activity, distress, fighting for nothing – tears – and on Saturday ALL DAY, I lived through the nightmare which I haven’t experienced for 2 years or more. I got it all. He ran away twice, total non-compliance, “he is going to burn the house down” hysteria, crying, tormenting me – all day . . .’
This mother then put her son back on evening primrose oil and the other supplements. Her letter goes on:
‘Jonathan is manageable again for the moment as I have now increased his dose – but it will take time again . . .’
Mother of four children Nikolette Bennett wrote this success story about her hyperactive son Christopher in Alive magazine in Canada:
At the end of a particularly disastrous day, I decided to try Efamol of which I had read positive reports. I began by rubbing a capsule of oil onto his wrists, every day. Within a week, a truly remarkable change took place. Christopher’s speech modulated, the door ceased slamming, and for the first time, he sat through and ate up all of his dinner. He stopped demanding dessert, and ate his breakfast cereal without sugar!
‘I find that I don’t have to use Efamol every day, now. In fact, Christopher knows himself when he needs it. His voracious appetite for sugared foods has disappeared . . .
The most wonderful aspect of being able to meet and overcome the challenge of Christopher’s hyperactivity is that at last we are able to express positive love for our delightful son. Christopher is happier within himself and about himself and our family lives in harmony again.’
*24/60/5*

Moclobemide

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
ILLNESSES IN CHILDREN: CHICKENPOX
Chickenpox is a viral infection that mainly affects children. However, adults can still contract the disease. Babies up to six months old are immune from the disease but it is best not to allow contact with children who have chickenpox when it is in the contagious stage.
What to look for if you suspect chickenpox: your child may feel unwell or seem to have a slight cold the day before any rash appears. This starts as a red spotty rash and is itchy. The rash soon becomes raised and forms pimples which become blisters. In about 4 days the blisters form scabs. This process continues until the whole rash has formed crusts.
As chickenpox is a highly contagious disease, your child should be kept home from school and away from other children until the rash has formed scabs and any fever has gone. The disease can be transferred to other children by droplets from the nose or mouth when they talk, cough, sneeze, or by direct contact with the rash or sores. The first symptoms of chickenpox usually appear between 12 to 21 days after contact with an infected person.
*12/199/5*

Zoloft (Sertraline)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Zoloft(Sertraline)
STRESS BREAKDOWN: IGNORING IMPORTANT PROBLEMS WHILE BECOMING PREOCCUPIED WITH TRIVIA
As a result of being unable to respond to problems which would normally have top priority, the over-stressed person might become apparently hopelessly disorganized, ignoring important decisions and busying himself with trivia.
For example, an over-stressed company general manager has to make some significant response to a real threat of industrial action from employees in a factory where a workmate has been killed accidentally. The union is concerned over safety procedures. The manager knows full well that a whole section of the factory is potentially unsafe and really needs rebuilding. However, the Board of Directors has made it clear that the company is just surviving, and the general manager knows that the extra expenditure to fix up the factory floor will be the trigger for closing down the business and result in the loss of many jobs, including his own. To make it more complex, the dead employee was clearly defying normal safety procedures, and the crisis might in fact be negotiable with the union.
However, the general manager has just come out of hospital following an operation for suspected cancer, and his wife’s father has just died. He is suffering from stress breakdown symptoms.
The day he is to meet with the union representatives, he seems not to be able to arrange an agenda for the meeting, but instead is preoccupied with ringing up to order more paper clips for his office.
The big problems appear not to be noticed, appear not to ‘register’ as important, as top priority, but the person instead reacts to little problems as before. When this behaviour is not recognized as due to stress breakdown, wrong assumptions may lead to totally inappropriate responses from others.
The spouses of over-stressed people might complain that the over-stressed person seems to have changed his priorities, or is deliberately ignoring the glaring needs of the family. Misunderstanding this symptom can lead to people feeling emotionally hurt at the apparent about-face in attitudes of the stressed person. ‘He’s so callous, doctor, and he just doesn’t care anymore. He thinks more of taking that dog for a walk than he does about helping me since I had my heart attack!’
It is obvious that a person who is switching off in response to major problems and strong stimuli is not capable at that time of organizing his life in such a way as to reduce the stress he is experiencing. A person in these circumstances needs to be rescued by someone else who will help that person get out of the increasing mess he finds himself in.
*35/129/5*

Snoroff

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
WHY BDD MATTERS
Millions of people have a secret obsession. They’re obsessed with how they look, with a perceived flaw in their appearance. They worry that their nose is too big, their breasts are too small, their skin is blemished, their hair is thinning, their body build is too small—any body part can be the focus of this obsession. It’s easy for us to discount these concerns. How can she worry so much about her looks when she’s so pretty? Why is he so upset about his hair—it looks fine! But people with these body obsessions suffer greatly, some are severely tormented, some consider suicide.
Most of us care about how we look—we think about our appearance and try to improve it. A recent survey of 30,000 people in the U.S. found that 93% of women and 82% of men care about their appearance and work to improve it. And other surveys have shown that many of us are dissatisfied with some aspect of how we look. We’re not pretty enough or sufficiently handsome. Who wouldn’t like a leaner body, smoother skin, more attractive eyes, a flatter stomach? If we could look better, most of us would. Indeed, most of us try. We wear makeup, buy flattering clothes, check our reflection in mirrors, carefully shave, and curl or straighten our hair, hoping to look okay. But when do normal concerns become an obsession?
The concerns of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) echo these normal concerns but are more extreme. People who have BDD not only dislike some aspect of how they look, they’re preoccupied with it. They worry too much. They’d like to worry less, but they can’t. Many say they’re obsessed.
They also suffer. Their worries about their looks cause them emotional pain and interfere with their life. Some BDD sufferers function fairly well despite their distress—no one would ever know how unhappy they are. Carrie, who worried about slight facial blemishes and her “small” breasts, was sometimes late for work because she got stuck in the mirror checking her face. And she missed parties because she thought she looked so bad she didn’t want people to see her. Yet she had many friends and did her job well. Because of his supposedly thinning hair, David had problems concentrating on his school work and missed the prom, but he still got good grades.
But when BDD is severe, friendships, intimate relationships, and work dis integrate. Jane was so tormented by her “huge” nose, “crooked” lip, “big” jaw, “fat and round” buttocks, and “tiny” breasts that she dropped out of school and couldn’t keep a job. She stopped dating and seeing her friends. Because she thought she looked so monstrously ugly, she locked herself up in her house for five years, finally even trying to kill herself.
What’s so intriguing about BDD is that people who have it focus on defects that others don’t see or consider minimal. Ironically, Jane was actually an attractive woman who had none of the defects she abhorred. David’s hair looked fine, and Carrie’s breasts were somewhat small, but not noticeably so. But to the BDD sufferer, the problem looks hideous and repulsive, magnified by the mind’s eye.
BDD concerns don’t make sense to others. How can she worry so much about her hair when it’s so nice? How could he be so upset about a few pimples? He should just stop thinking about it. “I’m always telling my wife she looks fine,” a high school teacher told me. “Why can’t she just stop worrying? Wrinkles aren’t that important! I tell her this all the time, but it doesn’t seem to help.” BDD is a problem because these people can’t stop worrying; reassurance doesn’t put an end to their concern.
*1/204/8*

Remeron (Mirtazapine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Remeron(Mirtazapine)
HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE BDD?”MY FACE IS FALLING”
Most people with BDD describe the perceived flaw in quite specific and understandable terms—for example, “My ears are pointed,” “I have a scar right here on my neck,” “My hairline is receding,” or “My waist,is too wide.” But others express it in ways that are vague and hard to understand. One man was preoccupied with his “inadequately firm eyes.” A woman described in a published case report complained of “a funny and crinkly nose,” and another stated, “the skin under my eyes joins my nose in a funny way.” A woman I interviewed was extremely distressed because her face was falling. I tried very hard to understand what she meant. After much discussion, it seemed that she thought that her facial muscles were wasting away and her facial skin was sagging. But she thought “my face is falling” best described her concern.
*45/204/8*

Desyrel (Trazodone)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Desyrel(Trazodone)
DEPRESSION IN CHILDREN: FATHER’S STORY
A father who first denied the truth, then dealt with it, tells of his experience to help other parents who might be baffled as to what to do to help their own depressed teenagers.
“At first, you tell yourself, ‘He’s a teenager and is just going through a phase.’ So you reassure yourself: ‘This will pass.’ But, little by little, the behavior becomes more aberrant. Initially, your child does attention-getting things that are out of line but fall just short of crossing that socially acceptable line – they are not quite ‘abnormal.’
“Then the phone calls start coming from his friends, from their parents, from his teachers, his coach, his principal, from neighbors, from the preacher. They tell you they’ve seen him do reckless things – diving from a cliff into lakes he has never swum before, taking ski jumps when he’s never been trained to do them. I got to hoping he might break a leg and be hospitalized for 6 weeks or so. It would keep him from killing himself and give us all a rest.
“Next came the flamboyant dressing – necklaces, eyeliner, punk clothing. He’s determined to shock.
“He objects strenuously even to the mildest household rules – a 10 P.M. curfew on school nights, for example. He begins to make sexually suggestive comments about girls. And he starts dating a string of girls from school – six or seven – regularly. All of this is uncharacteristic. We had a stranger in our house who looked like our son but acted like no one we knew.
“Anger or scolding produced violent reactions in him. We found a psychiatrist who was helpful, but still we weren’t fully satisfied.
“Then our son changed again. He started to make frequent references to deep unhappiness. He couldn’t concentrate on his studies. Passively suicidal feelings began to emerge. He’d say things like, ‘I wish I were dead.’
“That, we came to learn, was the downside of his illness – the depressed phase of manic depression. In the up side – the manic phase – you don’t feel effective as a parent, and you aren’t, but you sometimes do have some impact on him. In the depressed phase, you can’t get through at all. For instance, he’d play basketball and blame himself mercilessly for imagined blunders. He confided how he’d be in the middle of a game and find himself observing his actions as though he’d stepped out of his body. In a very real sense, he was disconnected from himself, from others, from life.
“We could see he was on the borderline of crossing from normal to something terrible. We found another psychiatrist. We had him institutionalized for about 6 weeks. Probably he’ll never forgive me for this. But it did help.
“The doctors finally diagnosed him: manic-depressive. Now, at least, what was wrong with him had a name – and a course of treatment.
“Once word got around about his illness, confidences came pouring in. People who never would have told you such things before came out with confessions and reassurances. They were manic-depressive. Or their son or husband or sister was, and lithium helped them.
“Knowing what I know now, having learned the hard way, I can see that this illness, manic depression, was as readily observable as mumps.
“He has made great progress, thanks to lithium treatments the doctor prescribes. But it’s a rough go, and the parents and the siblings of manic-depressives need help to cope. If there were a group of people who have lived through similar experiences or who are living through them now, I’d certainly welcome the chance to join them.”
*8/266/5*

Loxitane (Loxapine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Loxitane(Loxapine)
PSORIASIS
Dietary considerations
The Airola Diet, with emphasis on raw seeds and nuts, especially sesame seeds, flaxseeds, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds. Plenty of raw vegetables and fruits, organically grown, in season.
Cold-pressed vegetable oils, such as sesame oil and flaxseed oil, 2 tbsp. a day. Vegetable oils must be virgin, genuinely cold-pressed by hydraulic press, unrefined and unheated.
Avoidance of all animal fats (saturated fats) – pork, milk, butter, eggs. No refined or processed foods. No foods containing hydrogenated fats or white sugar.
Avoidance of citrus fruits, especially citrus juices. Cranberry or apple juice is permitted.
When the improvement is obvious, goat’s milk, yogurt and homemade cottage cheese (kvark) may be added to the diet.
Biological treatments
1. Since psoriasis is a metabolic disease, a cleansing juice fast, 2 to 3 weeks, is always advisable in the beginning of treatment. Fast can be repeated after 4 weeks on diet.
2. Avoid too frequent bathing. Do not use soap.
3. Mineral baths are extremely beneficial, especially hot mineral baths; also, regular sea water baths.
4. Sea water can be applied externally over affected parts with a cotton ball once a day.
5. Frequent exposure of affected parts to the sun, particularly in a combination with ocean swimming is extremely beneficial and often results in a striking improvement.
6. For external application: Formula F-Plus.
7. Plenty of regular exercise in fresh air, especially exposing the affected parts. Deep-breathing exercises.
8. If regular bathing in ocean is not possible, take a homemade salt water bath once a week
. Or take an acid bath once a week. Add one-half cup of apple cider vinegar to your bath water. This helps to restore acidity to the skin, which is imperative for restoration of health.
Vitamins and supplements (daily)
E- up to 1,600 IU
A – up to 100,000 units for one month, then reduce to 25,000 daily for 3 months; and repeat Lecithin – 4 tbsp. of granules, after 2 months reduce to 2 tbsp.
Calcium-magnesium supplement – 500 mg. of each
F (essential fatty acids) in capsule form or in form of flaxseed, sesame seed, or soy oil – 2 tbsp. a day B-complex, natural, high potency, with B12, B6 and folic acid Brewer’s yeast – 2-3 tbsp. Kelp – 5 tablets or 1 to 2 tsp. of granules С with bioflavonoids, up to 3,000 mg. Whey powder Sea water, 2-3 tbsp. a day, for trace minerals
Juices
Carrots, beets, cucumber, grapes, black currants. Avoid citrus juices.
Herbs
Sarsaparilla, burdock, elm bark, saffron, chaparral, dandelion, sassafras, mullein,
Specifics
Lecithin, vitamins E, A, B-complex, sesame seeds, sesame oil. Frequent exposure to sun and mineral or sea water. Specific herb teas.
*60/103/5*

Prozac (Fluoxetine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Prozac(Fluoxetine)
Other names: Fludac, Rapiflux, Sarafem
TOWARDS GOOD SLEEP: BEING KIND TO YOURSELF
Perhaps most importantly of all, now’s the time to start treating yourself kindly. We’re often told how important it is to love ourselves; many insomniacs, it seems, suffer from low self-esteem. If you’ve never felt really loved or valued, ‘loving yourself can seem like a tall order — or perhaps like a pat answer without much real meaning. What it involves is simply respecting and valuing yourself as highly as you would any other human being, and behaving accordingly.
Loving yourself is yet another habit that can be cultivated. It may take time, and you may need help, perhaps by joining a therapy or assertiveness group. Meanwhile, simply start by treating yourself as kindly as you would like others to treat you.
If you have negative feelings towards yourself, they may well have been implanted there when you were a child. Imagine that you are now given the care of that child: talk to it lovingly, and appreciate all the good things about it. When you hear the voice of that inner critic in your head, tell it firmly that that is an old programme you no longer need.
*48/169/2*

Asendin (Amoxapine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Asendin(Amoxapine)
UNDERSTANDING DEPRESSION: QUESTIONS ABOUT DRUGS AND TREATMENT
Many medicines now bring people out of depression. Could you sort them out for us?
This is the most exciting and hope-filled part of the depression story. Among the new drugs now available, we can find at least one or two that bring a depressed patient back to normal. We could not do that a few years ago.
Three groups of medicines are available: tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and lithium. All three alter the brain’s chemicals. They restore to normal the depressed patient’s mood, appetite, energy level, outlook, sleep patterns, and concentration. The tricyclics are the basic weapons against major depression, with the monoamine oxidase inhibitors as backups. Lithium works most effectively against bipolar disease.
What are the side effects of anti-depressive drugs? Can they be avoided?
The most common side effects include dry mouth, constipation, dizziness, and drowsiness—usually all mild. While taking monoamine oxidase inhibitors, patients should avoid certain foods (cheese, among others) to avert serious side effects.
Can psychotherapy, often called “the talking treatment,” help depressed people as much as medication can?
In patients who are not too severely depressed, psychotherapy seems to work as well as medication. But in major depression, symptoms generally are relieved more rapidly by drugs than by psychotherapy. Most people do best when doctors treat them by combining drugs with psychotherapy.
Does shock therapy really work? Many people claim it destroys brain cells and memory.
If a severely depressed patient threatens suicide or doesn’t respond to drugs, we rely on electroconvulsive therapy (ЕСТ), commonly called shock therapy. It is effective and quick acting. Because better medicines are available now, ЕСТ is used less and less. But new techniques also make ЕСТ safer than it used to be. It now produces less of the temporary confusion and less memory loss than it once did.
How can a depressed person’s family help?
The very nature of depression keeps the victim from seeking help. Family and friends can help most by encouraging patients to get the right treatment or even by taking them to the doctor. Overall, support, love, patience, and encouragement help far more than do blame, lecturing, and argument.
Where can a family get help?
The first line of defense is the family doctor, clinic, or health maintenance organization. Next, psychiatrists, psychologists, family therapists, and social workers can work with the patient to give the “talking treatment.” But of these, only psychiatrists, who are medical doctors as well, can prescribe drugs. Many mental health centers, hospitals, and universities have depression programs.
The National Institute for Mental Health has begun a new program on depression. What’s involved?
Everyone should know the symptoms of depression and the effective treatments for it. The goal of the project (called Depression/Awareness, Recognition and Treatment) is to help depressed persons get treatment and return more rapidly to normal activities, and perhaps even to save their lives. We are using every means of communication to put the message across.
*4/266/5*

Risperdal (Risperidone)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Risperdal(Risperidone)
TOWARDS GOOD SLEEP: GETTING INTO THE DRIVING SEAT
Whatever the cause of your insomnia, if you want to sleep better at night, it’s time to get into the driving seat and decide where you really want to go. What’s missing from your life that would give you some real joy or peace of mind? Whatever it is needs to provide a contrast with your daily routine, not more of the same.
If you’re a rusher-round, make time to do something totally unconnected with work. Do you do anything creative? Could you spend more time with your family — or less, if you’re constantly fulfilling their needs? Are you really doing what you want to do, or have you some unfulfilled dream that your busy lifestyle, or those inner voices, have so far prevented you from achieving? If so, what first step can you take towards it?
If you’re the unadventurous type, what could you do over this three-week period that would be a real challenge? Write a list of possibilities, things you’ve maybe thought of doing — if you only had the confidence, (They could include signing on at a self-assertion class.)
I’m not suggesting that you instantly chuck your job and family and go off to paint in Tahiti, like Gauguin. But we sometimes deny ourselves what we really want by telling ourselves it’s impossible. Or we find perfectly reasonable excuses for not getting it, either because the idea of change is threatening, or we’ve simply got into the habit of self-denial.
Write a list of things you haven’t done but would like to do. Be as fantastic as you like — if a journey to the moon comes to mind, write it down. At this stage, simply allow the ideas to flow, and if a critical inner voice jumps in to tell you not to be so silly, thank it and tell it it’s your life, and you’re in charge.
When you’ve written everything you can think of, look at that list as if it had been written by another person whom you are helping. What is really possible? Maybe it’s too late to become a prima donna or ballerina: but perhaps you could join a singing or dancing class (either of which would help you to sleep by using your energy in a healthy way). You want to write a novel, but feel you’re not talented enough? You’ll never know until you’ve written it. You’d like a more exciting social life, but you never get any invitations? Remember, you’re in the driving seat: take the first step and ask round the people you’d like to see more of.
Rushers-round may need less activity in their schedule, not more. You may be so strongly conditioned towards constant doing that ‘doing nothing’ doesn’t appear on your list; it may actually be quite scary. Yet ‘doing nothing’, allowing yourself a little space, to think, to day-dream, to enjoy a walk in nature, may be just what’s missing.
If you are depressed, it is really important to start moving, whether your depression is due to those inner voices, or to outer circumstances. If it’s caused by unhappy life events like bereavement, redundancy, or divorce, it’s a natural response. It’s true that you do need to go through the grieving process before you feel fully yourself again; this can be true after a relationship breaks up just as much as following a death. But don’t allow it to go on forever. Some people seem to stay stuck in their grief. If this is your case, it’s important to take action to move yourself out of the slough of despond: to leave the unhappy past behind and take on new ventures — a new job, or voluntary work, a new hobby, or any interest that will move you forward and open up new horizons.
Perhaps your depression is due to life circumstances, such as unemployment, or the loneliness of being a single mother with small children. Don’t let depression hold you back from helping yourself. Write down the aspects of your life that are making you unhappy. What can be changed? Can you get together with other people in the same boat to support each other, or join a self-help group? Make some kind of move, however small.
Perhaps you are depressed simply because you’re depressed: you don’t like or love yourself much. Make a point of behaving as if you do. Depressed people often skip meals and don’t bother about looking after their surroundings. A good start to defeating your negative inner voices is to look after yourself: include in your new programme a commitment to preparing proper meals and eating them slowly Invite yourself to a particularly nice meal once a week; give yourself treats. Keep your bedroom and bedlinen tidy, fresh and clean, as if for a valued guest.
As I’ve said earlier, sometimes it’s necessary to get help. It is not a sign of weakness to see a counsellor or psychotherapist. You’ve only got to listen to the radio phone-ins to agony aunts and uncles to realize that you’re not alone in needing help — and also, how helpful even a few minutes with a professional can be. Maybe getting help could be included on your list.
*49/169/2*

Elavil (Amitriptyline)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Elavil(Amitriptyline)
Other names: Endep
EYES’ COMMON DISORDERS: GLAUCOMA SYMPTOMS
It is important to everyone to be conscious of the warning signs and symptoms of this relatively common disorder. Glaucoma symptoms of which the patient becomes progressively conscious include the following:
1. Blurred vision and rainbow-colored rings around lights giving them a halo effect
2. Additional halo light effects around bright objects other than lights such as pieces of reflecting metal The gradual loss of side (peripheral) vision resulting in the victim seemingly viewing the world through a tunnel
4. Loss of one’s ability to adjust to darkened rooms such as in a theater
5. The need for increasingly bright illumination over time to read or sew
6. Difficulty in driving at night
7. Difficulty in focusing on close work
8. The frequent changing of eyeglass lenses without any noticeable improvement of satisfaction in seeing
9. in one kind of glaucoma, severe pain with redness and hardness of the eyeball.
Increased intraocular pressure, even when slight, affects the eye. The treatment of glaucoma is designed to correct the underlying problem in the drainage mechanism. In some cases, the disease can be halted with medication that reduces the inside eye pressure. In more advanced cases, surgery may be needed to provide a new outflow channel for the accumulated aqueous humor. The scapel is now being replaced by laser beams in which high-intensity light aimed through an operating microscope pierces the iris or opens the outflow mechanism.
If you are over the age of forty, you should have a periodic glaucoma checkup. Ophthalmologists recommend examination for the disorder once a year. Patients whose glaucoma is controlled by eye drops should follow the ophthalmologist’s instructions about their use.
*11/127/5*

Geriforte

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
NATURAL SLEEP
A good, uninterrupted night’s sleep is one of the most enjoyable and totally natural pleasures available to us. Yet for many people it is hard to come by. It has been estimated that at some time half the British population will be affected by insomnia. According to a Harris Poll commissioned by the Observer (published in February 1990), 16 per cent of us suffer from insomnia, although it rises to as many as 21 per cent in Scotland and the North. Some sources place the number of adult insomniacs as high as 35 per cent at any one time.
Insomnia not only causes stress; it is usually the result of stress. It is a sign that something in your life is out of balance: it may be emotional, environmental, or nutritional. It may be to do with your working life or lack of work, or to general un-happiness or depression. These are daytime problems, that need to be dealt with during the day.
Yet until recently the stock medical response has generally been to hand out a prescription for sleeping pills. In the Harris Poll, 12 per cent of those polled were taking sleeping pills, 9 per cent were taking tranquillizers and 7 per cent anti-depressants. In 1988 ?15.9 million’s worth of hypnotic drugs were prescribed, excluding those given directly by hospitals and doctors. This figure does not include the minor tranquillizers, which some people take to help them sleep.
GPs are becoming much less inclined to prescribe pills for insomnia; these days doctors as well as patients are concerned about the side-effects of drugs, in particular the long-term possibility of addiction. They know that drugs don’t solve the problems underlying insomnia, but many of them lack the time and facilities to help patients deal with these.
A variety of natural, drugless treatments have been found successful in restoring sleep. Many forms of natural medicine, including homoeopathy, acupuncture, and herbalism can help sufferers to regain physical and emotional harmony. Both orthodox and complementary practitioners recognize the value of relaxation techniques, counselling, nutritional advice, or simply helping people to train themselves into new sleeping habits. Unfortunately most of these methods require expert time and attention, of which NHS workers only have limited supplies.
Despite the fact that insomnia is so widespread and can be treated, there are very few specialist facilities for its treatment in Britain. Only two or three sleep disorders clinics are available within the Health Service (there are also some in the private sector), and the number of sleep research laboratories is diminishing. And although the 1980s have seen the rise of self-help groups for all kinds of problems I have not, in researching this book, found one for non-sleepers. (If any exist, it would be useful to know about them!)
There are doctors, scientists and psychologists who would like to see more attention paid to the problem and more and better services made available. Towards the end of 1989 a number of experts from a wide range of disciplines, including sociology and neurophysiology as well as medicine and psychology, joined forces to set up the British Sleep Society. Its general aim is to promote the study and treatment of sleep disorders, and to inform GPs and other physicians about what services are available. (The Society, composed of very busy professionals, cannot offer a direct service to the public.)
Meanwhile, there is a great deal that most insomniacs can do for themselves. I am going to be looking at the different types of insomnia, their possible causes, how you can help yourself, and where to go for help if you need it. Take heart: according to psychologist and sleep researcher Dr Jacob Empson, ‘the most intractable sleep disorders tend to be very rare’.
You can change your sleeping patterns, if you really want to. But because the quality of your sleep usually reflects the quality of your daily life, you may have to be willing to make some other changes, too. And it is within the power of most of us to make changes in our attitudes and habits to bring about not only a better night’s sleep but a happier daytime life.
*1/169/2*