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Archive for the ‘Anti-Allergic/Asthma’ Category

Tavist (Clemastine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Tavist(Clemastine)
ALLERGY EFFECTS ON THE BODY: THE STOMACH
The stomach is a simple, bag-like organ and is part of the alimentary canal. It lies between the esophagus and the small intestine. The upper end of the stomach connects with the esophagus, whilst the lower end opens into the doudenum, which is the upper part of the small intestine. The stomach serves as a storage place for food, enabling a large meal to be eaten at one time. It also produces hydrochloric acid and the enzyme pepsin, to digest the food partially.
There are a number of different foods that will irritate the mucous membrane lining the stomach. Highly spiced foods, extremely hot foods and alcoholic drinks can cause ulcers to develop in the stomach or duodenum. Another cause of stomach ulcers can be the regular ingestion of foods to which the person is allergic. It is interesting to note, that the Japanese have the highest rate of stomach cancer in the world, due to the high salt content in their diet.
Dr James Brennan, in his book, Basics of Food Allergy, says that some ulcers are actually a symptom of milk allergy. He discovered this after treating a patient of his who had a duodenal ulcer for over ten years. He found that, by putting his patient on a diet which excluded many of the allergenic foods, the ulcer symptoms disappeared within three days. One by one, various foods were then added back into the diet to see which food caused the allergy. When milk was added to the diet the patient suffered abdominal pain, vomiting and weakness. Once it was again removed from the diet the symptoms disappeared.
Dr Brennan went on to discover, by the same process, that his patient’s ulcer was also inflamed by wheat and pork. Once these foods were permanently removed, the patient remained symptom-free for sixteen years.
Other doctors have found that, after removing chocolate, coffee and other known allergenic foods from their patients diets, stomach ulcers have disappeared. Dr Albert Rowe, co-author of Food Allergy, has found that eliminating eggs from a person’s diet can greatly assist ulcer conditions.
There seems no doubt that stomach and duodenal ulcers are yet another symptom of the chronic masked food allergy.
*41/106/2*

Brethine, Bricanyl (Terbutaline Sulphate)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
CAUSES OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: EMOTION
Let me say at the outset that I am a firm believer in the theory that emotional upsets in a child can trigger an asthma attack.
Until very recently it has been widely accepted within medical circles that asthmatics were rather emotional types who could easily develop an attack when distressed. This was always said in a rather critical way as if inferring the child was a ‘weakling’. This opinion I am certain originates from people who have never had first-hand experience of looking after an asthmatic child. My own son, Ross is a very tough boy, but he tends to be a worrier. All through the school holidays he will be perfectly calm with little or no problem with his breathing. Two days before school all that changes as he starts to worry about going back. Within a few hours he starts to wheeze and become short of breath. In other words, it isn’t the asthma that produces the upset – it is the exact reverse. This does not make Ross a ‘weakling’ in any way but it does make him the type in whom stress can produce an asthma attack.
*5/211/5*

Sterapred (Prednisone)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Sterapred(Prednisone)
Other names: Meticorten
FOOD ALLERGIES: A MAJOR SOURCE OF ILL-HEALTH
People are getting sick, in fact chronically ill, simply by eating the foods that they have been brought up to believe are good for them. As doctors continue to experience growing numbers of patients with a wide range of recurring symptoms, the medical fraternity will have to acknowledge the affect of diet on their patients’ health.
In England, recently, Professor Maurice Lessoff completed an inquiry into food allergies for the Royal College of Physicians. He said that such illnesses are common and should be taken seriously. He found that, often, people with genuine food allergies are wrongly told they have a psychological problem. How many people have been forced to lead miserable lives because narrow-minded doctors are unwilling to accept food allergy as a major cause of illness! This situation is extraordinary when you consider that 2400 years ago Hippocrates, the great Greek physician, said that the most important thing, of which a doctor should take note, is his patient’s food and drink and the effects of these things on his health.
The almost universal consumption of highly refined foods, in the West, has become a serious problem. Take-away foods eaten daily by many people are particularly dangerous as they have been processed, flavoured and tenderised with a sickening array of artificial substances. The problem is one of degree. The human body can withstand the onslaught of a considerable amount of the processed toxic rubbish, contained in the Western diet. However, there comes a time when it cannot continue to do so. It simply becomes overloaded and begins to break down. This may happen at any time in life — from childhood onwards and to any person who persists in eating the modern, universally processed Western foods. High fibre additives are not enough. These do not act as an antidote for all the manufactured foods and substances that are, literally, wearing out the body.
*44/106/2*

Ketotifen

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
CHILDHOOD ASTHMA: CAUSES OF ASTHMA
A cardinal rule in any illness is to identify its underlying cause, because only then can specific treatment be given. In asthma the wheezing is produced by narrowing of the bronchial airways, mainly caused by muscle spasm in the walls of the tubes. The degree of this’ constriction determines whether the child has only minor symptoms or has extreme shortness of breath. But what causes this muscle to narrow in the first place?
It has been well proven that there are certain stimuli that will provide tightening of the airways. These are:
• Allergy
• Emotion
• Pollution
• Infection
• Exertion
Why, however, do these trigger factors not cause asthma in every child? The reason is that some children have an underlying general irritability of their breathing tubes, which means that the tubes constrict very easily on exposure to one of, or a combination of, these factors. This is undoubtedly an inherited trait which is present before birth and shows itself predominantly in the first ten years of life. After that age, the airways gradually become less sensitive and the child then ‘grows out’ of the asthma. Sometimes the bronchial muscles are so irritable that not only do they react to the inhaling of major stimuli but also to the accidental breathing of simple irritants like cold air and smoke. Even such commonplace disturbances as laughter or exercise can be followed in the asthmatic child by an embarrassing wheezing and tightness in the chest.
If you can identify which of these factors produce wheezing attacks in your own child then it is quite possible either to avoid them or dampen them down in some way so as to prevent the asthma starting. A few children are only sensitive to one of these groups, but more commonly it is a combination. Exposure to only a single stimulant may not be sufficient to create problems but as soon as another is thrown in, then the attack will start.
Before looking at these causes in more detail let us first consider 10 year-old Simon. Simon’s first major attack was a severe one in the middle of the night, but talking to his parents produced some interesting information about Simon’s prior symptoms. For the past three summers Simon had suffered quite marked hay fever, which is a condition produced by an allergy to pollen. His mother commented that he tended to worry about things, especially returning to school after the holidays. If he ever caught a cold he would have a troublesome cough for some weeks which was much worse if he was in a smoky atmosphere. During games periods Simon sometimes had to stop to catch his breath.
If we look for the precipitating causes for his actual asthma attack, it is easy to see that Simon has sensitivity to all the main groups of trigger factors; he has an allergy to pollen, is very emotional, has a persistent cough when in a polluted atmosphere or following a cold, and becomes short of breath on exertion. I suppose it is surprising therefore that Simon did not have a serious bout of asthma before the age of 10.
Four year-old Julie had suffered with eczema since she was a baby and seemed to have a constant runny nose. Eczema at this age is nearly always allergic in nature, and the repeated infections in her nose did not – as in most children – clear up in a couple of days, but always left her with an irritating cough. Thus Julie had only two of the major causes of asthma, i.e. allergy and infection, but they were still sufficient to give her a severe bout of wheezing.
*3/211/5*

Alavert (Loratadine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
Other names: Claritin
TESTS FOR ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: ALLERGY TESTS
All asthmatic children suffer from allergies, although some are more severe than others. It would seem logical to try to identify these allergens, so they can be avoided. The commonest method available is skin testing, which involves placing a drop of liquid on the arm and pricking the skin through the drop with a small needle. In the liquid is an extract of a particularly allergic substance, for example house dust. If the child has an allergy to this then an itchy red weal will form around the pin-prick, and the size of this weal is a reflection of how strong the allergy is to that particular trigger factor. Usually about six tests are carried out at the same time and normally include house-dust mite, feathers, dog and cat dander, grass and tree pollens. These can be added to if there is anything the parents think the child may be allergic to; nowadays skin tests can be prepared for virtually any chemical.
The usefulness of allergy tests is well illustrated by 10 year-old Suzie, who had never previously had any breathing problems. She was very keen to start horse-riding, but after a couple of lessons noticed a tickly cough and a tight sensation in her chest. The next week Suzie became a little short of breath when running to catch the horse. Then after a vigorous grooming and brushing session she became obviously wheezy and distressed. At the surgery I carried out a skin test with horse hair extract which produced a large red weal indicating a strongly positive allergy to horses. As it happened Suzie’s keen desire to learn riding had lessened so she decided to give it up rather than go through a course of desensitizing injections.
Some allergies are caused by inhaled substances which act directly on the lungs. However, there is a group of allergens which occur in food and drink which is thought to be responsible for between 10 and 20 per cent of all childhood asthma. The foods most commonly incriminated are dairy products including cow’s milk and cheese, eggs, wheat, yeast, fish, pork and nuts. Some children are sensitive to colorants and preservatives used by food manufacturers, and without doubt there has been an increase in the number of asthma cases caused by these in the past few years.
Mark was a 9 year-old boy who had always had a finicky appetite, periods of irritability, poor sleep and difficulty in concentration at school. This combined with his asthma suggested a food allergy. On asking about his diet Mark’s father remarked that he liked to drink plenty of orange squash and cola. The tartrazine in both these drinks is a well known allergen and on omitting both squash and cola all Mark’s symptoms greatly improved. On one occasion he did have a glass of squash at a party and this was followed quite quickly by a wheezing episode.
The difficulty with food allergies is identifying them accurately. Skin tests are occasionally useful but more often than not only a trial diet to avoid various foods will confirm sensitivity. This can be a problem because it may be several weeks before the allergy dies down. An example of this is dairy produce which can take up to six weeks before the airways settle. How to manage food allergies is discussed at greater length in the section on prevention.
*9/211/5*

Brahmi

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
TREATMENT OF ASTHMA ATTACK IN CHILDREN USING NATURAL THERAPY: ACUPUNCTURE
When considering the points to use in acupuncture it is important to consider that actual asthma attacks are associated with deficiencies of energy in the channels of Lungs, Spleen and Kidneys. When a child is wheezing this energy – known as ‘Chi’ – is prevented from making its normal journey along these channels because of the formation of phlegm and dampness in the lungs. Acupuncture treatment is aimed at relieving wheezing by encouraging the energy to overcome these blockages thus ensuring an unobstructed flow of Chi.
No child I have ever met likes the thought of needles being stuck in them and Clare was no exception. I reassured her that the needles are very fine and not like those used for injections. Most children have only ever experienced hypodermic needles for their vaccinations and these have to be larger so the immunization fluid can pass down the middle of them. Acupuncture needles do not need this property, so they are incredibly fine, producing virtually no pain when they pass through the skin.
To treat Clare’s asthma I used the following points, which I have found to be most effective. There is one needle inserted at the entry of each channel, the point in the hand being on the top surface between the thumb and first finger and the one on the foot being between the first and second toes. Needling the channels closer to the lungs involves the insertion of a needle at a point quite high on the back and also on the chest below the collar bone and another on the arm below where the triceps muscle covers the shoulder. There is one further point just below the knee which can generally reinforce the flow of energy through the body and it is beneficial to needle this as well. This makes only six points in all, which isn’t too many. This is one reason for always seeing an experienced therapist; there are over 50 suggested places to stick in the needles, so an unqualified acupuncturist may use far more points than are really necessary.
Initially, while Clare’s asthma was unstable, I treated her once a week. As with conventional medicine I monitored her progress using a peak flow meter. Her usual level was 300 but with this run of wheezing episodes it was hovering around 220. With weekly therapy over five weeks this peak flow rose back to its normal level. I reduced the treatment at that stage to once a month and now some time later all she has is a reinforcing dose every three months.
*56/211/5*

Zyrtec (Cetirizine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Zyrtec(Cetirizine)
MYALGIC ENCEPHALOMYELITIS — THE MULTI-ALLERGY MENACE
Myalgic encephalomyelitis, commonly known as M.E., is an ongoing condition, resulting from a severe viral or other illness. Another name for this condition is post viral syndrome. It is not in itself infectious but occurs when the victim is left with a damaged immune system, causing a range of debilitating symptoms. They include, extreme tiredness, aching, muscle weakness and impairment of some mental processes.
Symptoms, such as these, are not uncommon after viral infections, but rarely persist for more than a few weeks and then do not recur. However, when they do persist, or regularly recur for an abnormal period of time, perhaps for more than a year, then an ongoing illness emerges which is totally different to the original illness. In addition to a range of chronic and persistent symptoms, the victim also develops a masked intolerance to many foods, chemicals and inhalants. Life becomes very unpleasant indeed. The sufferers do not understand what is happening to them and usually in Australia, neither do their doctors. Many doctors in this country refuse to acknowledge the existence of multiple allergies or the illnesses that cause them. They continue to treat the symptoms, while ignoring a mass of evidence as to their cause, which has been readily available for more than a decade, particularly from the US.
Myalgic encephalomyelitis has been known by many other names over the past thirty years and has been reported in the British Medical Journal under such names as Icelandic Disease, Royal Free Disease and Akuryeri Disease, prior to its present name being commonly adopted. In America the same illness is known as neuromyasthenia. Like all illnesses involving multiple masked allergies, the most important factor in finding effective treatment is an awareness, by doctor and patient, that such illnesses exist, and are responsible for a wide range of chronic symptoms. There is still a long way to go before this awareness reaches a satisfactory level in this country.
During the past three years, there has been a number of reported outbreaks in Australia and New Zealand. Evidently the illness has a history of localized epidemicity with outbreaks being reported in institutional situations such as large hospitals, army barracks and schools, and thought to be due to an unidentified virus which remains in the body and causes continuing symptoms. The majority of sufferers however, appear to have been left with the condition as a result of some other serious illness which has had a damaging effect on the immune system.
In recent years, myalgic encephalomyelitis has become such an increasing problem in Western countries that M.E. Societies have been formed to help people cope with the illness, and to encourage medical research into its causes. There is still very little known about it in Australia and if it were not for the efforts of Professor Stewart Goodwin, of the Royal Perth Hospital, and one or two others, M.E. sufferers in this country would continue to grow ill without adequate medical help.
M.E. has not been reported in Third World countries. This probably indicates that the breakdown in our natural resistance to disease, caused by the chemicals in our over-refined Western diet, is making us very susceptible to illness. Particularly to illnesses which leave the victim with a damaged immune system. Often, the result is a multiple allergy condition with a wide range of symptoms, not commonly attributable to allergies. Due to the masked nature of the symptoms, the sufferer is left puzzled and perplexed.
It must be stressed that M.E. is a particular disease which incorporates multiple allergy symptoms, usually in a masked form. There are many other causes of chronic allergy illness, and this book seeks to provide a general insight into as many of them as possible.
*16/106/2*

Zyrtec-d (Cetirizine-pseudoephedrine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Zyrtec-d(Cetirizine-pseudoephedrine)
ALLERGIES AND INFANCY
The newborn baby does not have a fully functioning immune system or digestive system. These develop during the first twelve months of life. During this critical period, the child is dependent on the mother’s milk to provide immunoglobulins for protection and enzymes for digestion. Breast milk contains substances which give the infant immunity, as well as nutrients and enzymes in the exact proportion necessary for the baby’s needs. For this reason, a baby should be breast-fed for at least the first six months of life. If the child is introduced to foreign substances, such as cow’s milk and cereals too early, permanent damage to the developing immune system and lifelong allergy problems can result.
During the first few months of life a child does not produce enough enzymes to break down introduced foods sufficiently. A baby’s gut is very porous and relies on a secretion from the mother’s breast, called colostrum, which acts as a coating, thus preventing harmful protein molecules passing through the gut wall into the blood.
If the child is denied this protection, undigested food particles will enter the bloodstream and confuse the developing immune system, which then accepts them as normal. This causes immunological havoc and instead of being digested by enzymes and white cells, the substances may be ignored by the immune system and left to cause allergy reactions. The problem may continue into adult life, causing further damage to the body and increasing illness.
*15/106/2*

Ventorlin

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
TREATMENT OF THE MULTI-ALLERGY MENACE
Apart from getting as much rest as possible, interspersed with careful, moderate excercise, the major solution to overcoming M.E. symptoms is to identify the food and chemical allergies resulting from the illness. Until identified, these substances will continue to aggravate the condition and cause the repeated flare-up of symptoms. Once the allergens have been removed, the individual always improves and, in many cases, a slow recovery to good health has been achieved. Without the removal of allergens an M.E. sufferer cannot recover. Therefore, the most vital first step to recovery is the identification and removal of all food and chemical allergens from the diet and environment.
M.E. sufferers are particularly sensitive to chemicals. Even such seemingly innocuous things as perfumes, after shaves and scented soaps can bring on fatigue, aching, headaches, catarrh and dizziness within a few seconds of exposure. Hydrocarbon fumes such as petrol fumes exhaust fumes and pressure pack sprays are particularly dangerous. Chemicals and preservatives in food and drink are another constant aggravator and must be removed from the diet. Avoidance of chemicals in food, drink and in the air, is the key to allowing an overloaded immune system to commence a long and slow recovery. This may take one or two years but improvement will invariably result if these rules are firmly followed. It is important to seek help for this problem from a medical practitioner or naturopath, who understands the illness and is prepared to spend (he time necessary to help you get well. When seeking to eliminate foods that have become toxic because of M.E., there is a widespread tendency to regard ‘natural foods’ as healthier than those with artificial additives. This is not necessarily the case. Many additives, particularly preservatives, are chemically identical to those found naturally in food. However, concentrations in food containing artificial additives, can be much higher than those found naturally. When these are ingested reguarly from a variety of processed foods, they can overload the system and cause allergy illness.
Because M.E. intolerances are essentially chemically caused, whether by direct exposure, or through food and other substances, many foods that contain these chemicals, in natural form, can cause further illness to M.E. sufferers. Examples are those foods containing salicylates and benzoates in comparatively high amounts, and these can be some of the seemingly innocuous fruits and vegetables. It is essential therefore, to suspect all foods, until a process of testing can safely eliminate those that are doing harm. Merely changing one’s diet to whole grains, nuts, yoghurt, fruit and vegetables, etc. will not be successful and can, if anything, worsen both disease and symptoms.
It is absolutely essential for all M.E. sufferers to take a complete range of supplementary nutrients to assist their recovery. Without supplementation of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, amino acids and most important of all, enzymes, any attempts to recover will be a waste of time.
Exercise is important during the recovery phase to stimulate metabolism, particularly to switch back on currently inoperative oxygenase enzymes. However, it must not be overdone. Because M.E. sufferers take four times as long as healthy persons to recover from exercise, it should be commenced at about one quarter capacity and built up very slowly. It is a mistake to do more than this. Ability to recover from exercise must be almost immediate. If taken beyond this point, more harm than good will be done and a relapse will surely occur. For further information on exercise.
Because of the nature of some the symptoms of M.E. many doctors label the sufferer as ‘psychologically unsound’. Fortunately, there are a few doctors throughout the country who take this illness seriously, and they are to be found by contacting the State branch of the M.E. Society.
*19/106/2*

Benadryl (Diphenhydramine)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
CAUSES OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: POLLUTION, INFECTION
Pollution
This category is extremely important in triggering wheezing episodes. On many occasions I have been called out to see children with asthma only to have to fight my way through a cloud of cigarette smoke to reach them. An irritant atmosphere is deadly to a child’s lungs, and it amazes me that so many parents will subject their children to such torture. In fact I now carry round with me a small machine which analyses the amount of smoke in the air so I can show parents the high levels only one cigarette can produce.
Other pollutants that are harmful to the lungs include the smoke from coal fires, industrial smog, and car exhaust fumes.
Infection
‘When he catches a cold it goes straight on his chest.’ This is a frequent comment from parents and undoubtedly it occurs with certain types of infection. It is most important to distinguish viral infections from bacterial ones, as it is the former that produce the wheezing. The common cold is produced by a virus and this then irritates the airways, producing an asthma attack. Other infections, like tonsillitis, sinusitis, and pneumonia, are caused by different bugs called bacteria – but these for some reason do not irritate the chest. It is important to understand this as antibiotics will kill bacteria but not viruses. Antibiotics therefore have absolutely no part to play in the treatment of asthma and should not be looked upon as necessary or beneficial either by doctors or parents.
*6/211/5*

Advair Diskus (Fluticasone, Salmeterol)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
THE ALLERGIC REACTION
There are five different classes of immunoglobulins in the body. These are known as IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD and IgE. IgG is the principal immunoglobulin in the blood and internal fluids. Its job is to remove soluble antigens from the body, in conjunction with other immune complexes. IgA, and to a lesser extent IgM are the main secretory immunoglobulins. They form a protective coating on the body’s mucosa, thereby limiting entrance of antigens through the mucosa surfaces, such as in the nasal passages and the gut. Evidently, the physiological functions of IgD and IgE are not fully understood. It is thought that IgE may play an important part in ridding the body of mucosal infection but is ineffective in ecological illness. On the other hand, IgD may act as the trigger to initiate immune responses as it has been observed that, when a mucosal surface is under attack by antigens, initiation of IgE production is dependent upon a lymphocyte that contains IgD.
When the antigen is an allergenic substance (the allergen), the leucocytes and immunoglobulins are unable to cope with it. The antibody and the antigen react, causing a malfunction in the body’s defences. The mast cells, which are found in mucous membrane and connective tissue, break up. As a result, chemicals such as histamine, are released and these cause irritation and damage.
Some antigens may reach the bloodstream by way of the body’s mucous surfaces. There, they attach themselves to red and white cells or form immune complexes with specific antibodies. These are carried around the body and can cause direct tissue injury, for example a precipitate in connective tissue which can block small blood vessels. This results in fever, aching, muscle pains, and can happen after eating a certain food. Those mysterious, but troublesome, back and joint pains which appear to have no rational cause, can be the result of an allergic reaction. Alternatively, the symptoms may not relate to a specific ‘target’ area. Instead, inflammation and fever may occur over the entire body. This can make it difficult to identify as an allergic reaction.
When inflammation or fever occurs as part of the immune response, it may be localized at an area of infection or be dispersed throughout the entire body. If the latter happens, the body temperature will increase and cause greater enzyme activity. This in turn, increases the metabolic rate; providing extra energy for the production of the leucocytes and immunoglobulins needed to fight the invading antigens. Although, in the case of an allergic reaction, this process is not successful, it may explain why allergy sufferers, particularly of food and chemical allergies, often tend to feel overheated.
*14/106/2*

Metaproterenol

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###
FOOD ALLERGIES: CEREALS AND GRAINS
Forty years ago, Dr Edward Howell, of Chicago, described extensive research into the eating habits of Malays and Filipinos. He found that these people, who subsisted mainly on rice, had all developed hypertrophy of the pancreas.
Further studies since then have shown that large consumption of other grain products has the same effect. Hypertrophy of the pancreas is enlargement, due to overwork, over a long period of time. Grain products are impossible to digest raw and must be cooked, or processed, first. Even then, large amounts of pancreatic enzymes are needed to consume them which can often lead to a tired and inefficient pancreas from middle life onwards. The message is clear; do not eat grain and cereal products every day. They should be eaten sparingly, to provide diversity, not bulk.
Allergy sufferers will often find they are allergic to wheat and, perhaps, other grains, such as oats and corn. If they have been big eaters of these foods in the past, their overworked pancreas may no longer be coping efficiently. As a result undigested particles are reaching their bloodstream and causing allergic reactions, often in the form of masked, recurring symptoms which appear to have no relativity to bread or other grain food concerned. Sensitivity to grains can be further aggravated by the bleaching agents used in white flour and other chemicals used in the modern refining and milling process.
Dr Abraham Hoffer, a renowned Canadian psychiatrist and nutritionist, commented, at a recent Australian seminar, on the effects of reduced cereal intake in European countries during both World Wars. He pointed out that, before the invention of agriculture, humans had been hunter/gatherers, but now consumed too many cereal products, especially refined breads and flours. During both wars, European countries had problems getting enough wheat from North America and elsewhere. As a result, these countries, including the UK, showed improved health and a much lower rate of admissions to mental hospitals. He said the reason for this was that many people have only a limited capacity for digesting grain products, especially wheat. Therefore, excessive grain consumption for these people (which could simply mean eating bread every day) would result in severe allergy, with such distressing symptoms as schizophrenia, coeliac disease and various gastrointestinal illnesses, including chronic constipation.
In his research Dr Hoffler had found that severe digenerative disease, brought about by intolerance to the excess use of grains in the Western diet, had developed amongst, comparatively healthy, primitive tribes, within a mere twenty years. This was particularly evident in studies of the Kung, in Southern Africa, the Australian Aborigines and the Prima Indians of Arizona.
The cereal problem, has been further aggravated by the fact that, since the Second World War, babies have invariably been weaned onto cereals far too early in their development. For many people, this has resulted in permanent damage to the intestinal lining, with subsequent impairment of digestion. As a result, not only do they have a lifelong allergy to cereals, but they can suffer from poor absorption of nutrients generally and require daily supplements to keep in reasonable health. Abstinence from cereals is vital for these people, if they wish to remain well.
*49/106/2*

Aristocort (Triamcinolone)

Friday, November 6th, 2009

###table###Aristocort(Triamcinolone)
Other names: Triacet, Triderm
CAUSES OF ASTHMA IN CHILDREN: EXERTION
This may seem a strange cause, as even the fittest among us will become short of breath during exercise. The difference is that in non-asthmatics when the exertion is stopped the airways quickly settle back to normal. In asthma sufferers this is not so. The breathing tubes reach their narrowest between three and five minutes later, remaining at that level for some time after. In other words the shortness of breath actually increases when exercise is stopped. Different sports are more harmful than others and running is certainly the worst. Wheezing when exercising may occur in asthmatic children within six to eight minutes, and this can be very hazardous in a cross-country run at school. Cycling induces asthma although not so consistently, perhaps because only the legs are used. Other factors, like a cold wind and exhaust fumes, may play a contributory part in asthma caused by cycling. Swimming seems to be the most innocuous of all and can be recommended to everyone. As a general rule light exercise is less likely to induce wheezing although a harder sport like football can be well tolerated provided it is in brief bursts with some respite in-between.
Almost all asthmatic children have wheezing with exercise but why this should occur is a mystery. It is thought that it must be due to the release of some chemical in the lungs that affects the muscles in the airways. This is really of little practical help at this stage, but hopefully in the future it may be possible to identify and reverse the effect of this substance.
Simon’s first attempt at cross-country running was a disaster, as he had to give up on the second lap. This was most upsetting to him as he didn’t want to appear ‘soft’ to the rest of his classmates, and his teacher thought he was not really trying. It was only when he saw Simon in considerable distress a few minutes after stopping that he realized how serious the condition had become. Simon’s parents wanted him to be able to do everything that normal children can do and naturally this is the aim of treatment in all asthmatic children.
By accurately identifying the causes of your child’s asthma it is quite easy to take the necessary steps to deal with them.
*7/211/5*