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Other names: Dicycloverine
INTAKE AND OUTGO: DIGESTION
It takes a great deal of material to satisfy the needs of the human body. A little something thin as sunbeams comes in through the skin. The lungs take care of the gases. Everything heavier is received and handled in the alimentary canal. Transformation of food and drink into tissue — to replace wear and tear and to grow - and into energy, is of course fundamental to all animal life. This is a chemical and physical change, and continues in man throughout his three score years and ten, or more.
Man, a highly developed mammal, consumes a varied diet, the chemistry of which is complicated. The wonder is not that he has occasional feelings of discomfort in his digestive tract, but that he can overwork this system as most Americans certainly do, and get by with it. He chooses what he puts into his mouth; then automatically a remarkable combination of motion, secretions from glands, and chemical changes occur, starting with his saliva as his mouth waters at the taste, sight, or smell of (sometimes at the mere thought of) his favorite foods.
The food travels down through the ailimentary canal, mouth to rectum, normally in some four to six hours. During most of this passage, various juices pour or trickle into the food mass, the appearance of which gradually changes into a thin soupy liquid in the small intestine. Much of it here is in soluble form, ready to be absorbed through the walls of the intestine into the adjoining blood stream.
Of course much of this fluid is provided by our drinks, and as chemical reactions seem to progress best in a fluid medium the old taboo against drinking water with our meals is really ridiculous. Nevertheless, many persons, chiefly women, have shown that one can subsist on very few drinks. A large and important part of the fluid comes from glands. A gland is a collection of cells which forms and gives off to the body a secretion. Glands vary in size from some so small that the naked eye does not distinguish them, to the liver, weighing pounds.
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